Quebec

Hotels in Quebec

Hotels in Quebec are known for their quality service, and you can certainly find one that suits your needs. Whether you are looking for quaint bed & breakfasts, contemporary boutique hotels or grand Victorian hotels, Quebec has them all.

Montreal and Quebec City have some of the best hotels in Quebec, and those are perfect destinations for visitors looking for pampered luxury. In Quebec City, the stately 18th-century façade of the Auberge Saint-Antoine doesn't give away what’s behind it: a modern boutique hotel, complete with sharply dressed concierges and an up-tempo lobby soundtrack. This mix of new design and old world charm is typical of hotels in the French-Canadian cities. The Loews Le Concorde Hotel is another modern luxury hotel--the antithesis to the colonial buildings and fortifications of Vieux-Québec. The Loews’ enviable location at the city’s highest point gives guests expansive views of the St. Lawrence River, the Gaspé Peninsula, and Île D’Orleans.

Two classic old hotels in Quebec that cannot be missed, even if just for an afternoon tea, are the two castles of Fairmont Le Chateau Frontenac, set above the St. Lawrence River within the walls of Old Quebec, and the Fairmont Le Manoir Richelieu, snuggled between the mountains and the sea. The aristocrat-worthy furnishings and majestic architecture will make every guest feel like royalty.

Are you looking for a more contemporary one-of-a-kind experience? Quebec hotels have something original to offer more adventurous travelers. Try the Ice Hotel in Quebec City, which is open from January to March with a new design every year. Even if you don’t stay overnight check out the bar where you can have a drink while admiring the amazing ice sculptures of the hotel, while wrapped in a parka.

Hôtel Le Germain is a testament to its French-Canadian province with original art, locally made furniture, and bedding by Quebec fashion designer Marie Saint Pierre. The rooms, renovated in 2009, have large windows providing natural light and city views.

The too-cool faux-hawked staffers at this über-chic boutique hotel might be off-putting if the rooms weren’t so stylish and comfortable. Playful fabrics—suede headboards, cowhide chairs, faux-fur throws—brighten the dark walnut floors and cool, white walls.

Housed in two buildings, including an old leather factory from the 19th century, the 24-room hotel appeals to young entrepreneurs with its tech-savvy touches like free Wi-Fi and plasma TV’s outfitted with Wii Fit stations.

Located at the intersection of Rue Sherbrooke and Boulevard Saint-Laurent—equidistant from downtown and the Plateau—this property should have been a slam-dunk when it opened in 2004 as the design-driven Hotel Godin.

Stepping into the St-James feels like stepping back into a genteel, Gilded Age manse.

The hotel consists of a 22-story tower and the former headquarters of the city’s Gazette newspaper.

Consisting of three combined 19th-century office towers, the hotel features boutique-style rooms that mix historic details from the buildings’ past (soaring columns, exposed bricks, arched windows) with sleek, contemporary interiors.

The era of the minimalist design hotel may be drawing to a close, but this surprisingly affordable hotel shows no signs of losing its edge.

Thick stonewalls, a Breton façade, and iron shutters hint at the heritage of La Maison Pierre du Calvet, built in 1725. Located on a cobble stone street in Old Montreal, the hotel has a library for guests, plus an outdoor garden terrace and indoor greenhouse with parrots.

An antithesis to the colonial buildings and fortifications of Vieux-Québec, the highly modern and angular Loews Hôtel Le Concorde has an enviable location at the edge of The Plains of Abraham in Battlefield Park.

With most of the city’s top hotels near the old city, many a traveler interested in exploring the boutiques, restaurants, and lounges of Montreal’s colorful central neighborhoods (Le Plateau, Outremont, Mile End) has been forced to shuttle to and fro via taxi.

Located in downtown's Golden Square Mile, the palazzo-style building housing the Ritz-Carlton, known as “La Grande Dame”, has a history dating back to 1912. A $150-million renovation that started in 2008 has modernized the hotel and its 130 rooms and suites.

A formerly gritty Holiday Inn, the property fits right into rapidly gentrifying St.-Roch. Interiors are awash in charcoal grays and stark whites, with graffiti-inspired art, mod Japanese soaking tubs, and windows that look out onto surrounding steeples.