Quebec

Things to do in Quebec

Look no further for the best of what to do in Quebec so you can enjoy your stay and have some fun. Those looking for outdoor things to do in Quebec will be thrilled with the province’s expansive natural landscape and sweeping vistas, inviting visitors to enjoy fishing, hunting, cycling, boating and wildlife observation.

When thinking about what to do in Quebec, do not forget the province’s many festivals that happen year round—from the dead of winter to the height of summer. The Quebec City Summer Festival is one of the main music events in Quebec and is held annually in July. Summer also boasts the Montreal Jazz Festival, the F1 Canadian Grand Prix and the Montreal Beer Festival. In winter, young revelers can enjoy Igloofest or the more family friendly Fete des Neiges, which has ziplines, tubing, sled dog tours, skating, shows, and live music.

Old Quebec City (Vieux Quebec) is the perfect place to enjoy some shopping and nightlife along the cobblestone streets filled with boutiques, cafes, patisseries and specialty shops. The historic district of Old Quebec is a great example of a fortified village. With a military and religious history, in Old Quebec the past is highlighted by the preserved architecture. Visitors can meander past horse-drawn carriages, street performers and the Rue du Trésor, an open-air art gallery. Wander along Dufferin Terrace to gaze across the beautiful St. Lawrence River—in winter you can watch the ice flow downstream.

Amongst all the things to do in Quebec, art lovers will not be disappointed. The Musée National des Beaux-Arts du Québec showcases work made in Quebec or by Quebec artists. The beautiful Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, famous for its geometric glass front, houses one of the most impressive art collections in Canada.

Evidence that Montreal designers can compete on the world’s stage: the glorious interior of Pullman, which merges mid-century modernism (polished wooden tables, stone floors, and a palette of gray, black, and cream) with a hint of 21st-century baroque (a multitiered wine-glass and champagne-flute

The shop features a well-curated assortment of clothing and artifacts

The oldest public market in Montreal, the Lachine Market dates to the 1840’s. The farmers’ market became a permanent market in 1909, and the bulk of items on sale are still basics like local cheeses, fresh breads, and garden vegetables.

Dubuc made his name with his super-sleek men’s wear collections (in a palette that rarely strays far from black, gray, slate, or beige).

Le Paingrüel is one of the most popular boulangeries in Quebec City. Located in the heart of the St.-Jean-Baptiste district, the bakery is housed in a red-brick building with a wood-and-glass storefront on the first floor.

Historically home to the city’s working-class, English-speaking black community, the gentrifying, still-off-the-tourist-map neighborhood that gave rise to Montreal’s famed jazz scene is now attracting attention for its hip new restaurants.

Rising from a bustling plaza in the center of Upper Town, this impressive cathedral belongs to the oldest parish in North America. Rebuilt twice since its completion in 1647, the Neoclassical structure retains its original bell tower and portions of the 17th-century walls.

This neighborhood wine bar has a stylish décor that evokes a ‘60s-era Danish living room (Wegner-style chairs, teak bookcases), plus a lively atmosphere (and live piano music on Thursday nights).

The brewing tradition is alive and well in Quebec, nowhere more so than at this excellent, nothing-but-the-basics microbrewery just a few blocks east of Laurier’s tony boutiques—far enough away, that is, to maintain its authenticity.

Les Tam Tams is a free music festival held on rainless Sundays from May through September; it attracts drummers, dancers, vendors, and curious visitors.

Terrasse Dufferin, which is perched just below the iconic Fairmont Château le Frontenac, is a public park with sweeping vistas of the St. Lawrence River.

Proof that Montreal is an epicurean’s dream: this exquisitely ordered kitchenware store in Outremont’s poshest shopping neighborhood.

Yvonne and Douglas Mandel, pioneers of the new Vieux, showcase their sharply tailored menswear here.

Known as the Plateau, this hip, vibrant, edgy community is Montreal’s answer to Manhattan’s Greenwich Village and Lower East Side.

Sitting like a five-pointed star among The Plains of Abraham and just above Terrasse Dufferin, La Citadelle de Québec is a still-active military base (home to the French-speaking Royal 22nd Regiment) and a complex of buildings and fortifications built circa 1820.