Provence Travel Guide

The Château produces some of the region's finest olive oils—fruity, rich
blends with remarkably low acidity. After a brief tour of the property,
guests take seats in an upstairs salon for a tasting led by Jean-René

Buy traditional dishes in yellows and greens.

As producers of an A.O.C. Vallée des Baux de Provence oil, the 18th-century Château d'Estoublon is required to press its olives within three days of harvesting to prevent fermentation. Instead, it does this rule one better by pressing the fruit inside of 24 hours.

A tantalizing array of stalls selling everything from olives and spices to fabrics, shawls, and tablecloths. Be sure to stop by the master chocolatier Joël Durand, who flavors his exquisite chocolates with flowers and herbs.

To purchase the lusty red that Dominique Hauvette turns out under the Baux de Provence appellation at Domaine Hauvette, you'll need an appointment—if you can snag one. The proto–micro estate occupies just 35 acres at the foot of the lunar Alpilles mountains.

Carole, the gregarious chef and owner of the Good News Café in Woodbury, Connecticut, and her French husband, publisher Bernard Jarrier, host groups of 8 to 10 adventurous foodies several times a year at their home in the sleepy Provençal town of Montfrin

Active travel (cycling; walking; sea kayaking; rock climbing) paired with unexpected cultural experiences (storytelling in Ireland; a game of boules in Provence; visiting mask makers in Bali).