Provence

Restaurants in Provence

Provence restaurants have made their mark on the world of cuisine by combining traditional French ingredients with Mediterranean flavors. Its culinary all-stars get creative with fresh seafood, olive oils and a little extra spice, and the result is regional specialties such as ratatouille, pesto soup and the pizza-like pissaladier. Our guide highlights the best places to eat in Provence, including Le Clos de la Violette in Aix-en-Provence, which serves expertly prepared versions of the region’s signature dishes. Other outstanding Provence restaurants, like the Michelin-starred L’Atelier de Jean-Luc Rabanel in Arles, take a more avant-garde approach to cooking. Here, guests can settle in for multi-course tasting menus that get creative with seasonal, organic ingredients.

During the warm summer months, take the opportunity to dine al fresco many of the best restaurants in Provence. Les Deux Garcons offers outstanding outdoor dining from its location overlooking Aix’s iconic tree-lined boulevard, the Cours Mirabeau. Or, take in rural Provence at country bistros like L’Auberge in quaint Saint-Pantaléon-Les-Vignes. Housed on a 146-year-old property, the restaurant serves first-class prix-fixe meals.

In a century-old house across from the train station in L'Isle-sur-la-Sorgue, a celebrated riverside town of antiquaires, Le Jardin du Quai is one of the best new restaurants in Provence.

Christmas Eve dinner at the château's Bistrot Mogador is a don't-miss: a traditional gros souper-grilled sea bass with aioli, vegetable gratin with black truffles, and more.

One of the contemporary bistros in Arles

The former mansion of Jules Pernod, creator of the famous anisette liqueur that still bears his name, now houses one of Avignon's newest restaurants, Numéro 75.

This Michelin one-star property sits on a bucolic farm with olive groves and fig trees in the village of Les Paluds-de-Noves. Lunch, prepared by La Maison's chef, Christian Peyre, begins with St.-Pierre poêlée—sautéed John Dory capped with bacon and serve

AOC

New owners Jean-Louis and Mireille Pons, from nearby Arles, took over Chez Quénin, changing the name to the trendier-sounding Bistrot du Paradou and improving the cuisine, while maintaining the character—vintage-tiled floors, stone walls, timbered ceilings—of the old place.

Located on a narrow street opening onto the Place du Forum in the heart of old Arles, this former charcuterie dates from 1942. The tiny space is now a winsome bistro with a modest décor of red velvet banquettes and pig figurines.