Portugal Travel Guide

The elaborate neo-Gothic façade of this former library barely hints at the opulence inside: carved wood, gilded pillars, ornamented ceilings, and a gorgeous red staircase lit by a stained-glass atrium.

Vineyard tours and tastings are by appointment only at this boutique producer in the Rio Torta Valley.

Pasteis de Belém, the city’s famous custard tart, is sold in a lot of places, but the freshest come from this small confectionery near the Jerónimos monastery.

Score rare fragrances from Saboaria Confiança, Miller et Bertaux, and Absolument Absinthe, as well as ceramics by Flemish artist Piet Stockmans.

Promoter Manuel Reis's club at the docks is the place to go to dance to pumping house music all night long with a lively crowd of creative types and bar-crawlers.

The butter-soft lambskin and leather gloves rival anything you'll find in Paris, but at bargain prices.

To hear traditional Fado, hit the alleys of Alfama late at night; the melodies float out from restaurants and clubs. Parreirinha dates from the 1950's, and is a longtime favorite of everyone from foreign visitors to true fadistas.

Clube de Fado is one of the top hot spots to hear Portugal's folk music and owner and guitarist Mario Pacheco has assembled a strong roster of traditional fadistas, including Maria Armanda and Machado Soares.

A nine-day, village-wide medieval street fair held every July sounds corny and is corny, in a good way, with falconry and weaving demonstrations, wine and grappa tastings, art exhibits, concerts, a photography competition, and stalls selling artisanal soaps and exquisite ironwork, like hinges and

This latest addition to Belém’s sprawling Cultural Center opened in June 2007 and houses a 1,000-plus inventory of modern and contemporary paintings, sculpture, and videos dating from 1909 (Picasso) to 2005 (Luc Tuymans).

Tours include tastings and a visit to the wine cellar. The Pimental family plans to open a 14-room inn on the property later this year.

This Art Nouveau jewelbox in the center of Chiado is the place for chocolates, fine coffee, and other gourmet treats.

The sound system is extra powerful and the crowd is scruffy-cute—intentionally so. Frequented by intellectuals and people from the arts, theater, and cinema.

Snag one of the 18 wooden stools at this diminutive Bairro Alto boîte, where you can savor a singular Chardonnay from the emerging Alentejo region and be wowed by Barca Velha—a mythical Upper Douro red released only in exceptional years.