Portugal

Portugal Travel Guide

A delicious array of rainbow-colored, fashion-forward dresses, skirts, and tops hangs from meat hooks in this converted butcher shop.

In a former bank in Baixa, you’ll find an exhaustive collection of contemporary furniture (Ponti; Studio 65) and vintage couture (Dior; Westwood). All of the 1,000 or so pieces at the Museu do Design were first bought for private use.

Fado, a melancholic style of acoustic Portuguese music dating back to the 1820's, is still an intricate part of the culture. It's mostly found at late-night clubs, but you can hear a sample and get a lesson in its history at this quirky museum.

Located in the Parque das Nações district along the Tagues River, the Pavilhao Atlantico serves as Lisbon's largest indoor arena and is easily accessible from the Gare do Oriente transportation hub.

Located next to the Jeronimos Monastery, the Belém Cultural Center (Fundação Centro Cultural de Belém, or CCB, to natives) comprises five main areas: the Conference, Performing Arts, and Exhibition Centers and the Educational and Formation Areas.

Fine foods and wines (assemble a case to ship home some of the local vintages).

The elaborate neo-Gothic façade of this former library barely hints at the opulence inside: carved wood, gilded pillars, ornamented ceilings, and a gorgeous red staircase lit by a stained-glass atrium.

Pasteis de Belém, the city’s famous custard tart, is sold in a lot of places, but the freshest come from this small confectionery near the Jerónimos monastery.

Vineyard tours and tastings are by appointment only at this boutique producer in the Rio Torta Valley.

Score rare fragrances from Saboaria Confiança, Miller et Bertaux, and Absolument Absinthe, as well as ceramics by Flemish artist Piet Stockmans.

Promoter Manuel Reis's club at the docks is the place to go to dance to pumping house music all night long with a lively crowd of creative types and bar-crawlers.

The butter-soft lambskin and leather gloves rival anything you'll find in Paris, but at bargain prices.

To hear traditional Fado, hit the alleys of Alfama late at night; the melodies float out from restaurants and clubs. Parreirinha dates from the 1950's, and is a longtime favorite of everyone from foreign visitors to true fadistas.