Restaurants in Portugal

Locals converge on this Belgian-influenced restaurant in a former 17th-century convent for lambic, abbey, and Trappist ales, and for the bull-steak frites. An outpost of this Portuguese standby opened next door to the Fado Museum, but the 34-year-old original remains a favorite.

Fill up on goat casserole at the Varanda do Alentejo lunch counter.

The savory crêpes are generously sized, the hummus is house-made, and the jewelry in the clever wall-mounted cases is for sale.

A Baiuca is tucked down the cobblestone Rua de Sao Miquel in Alfama. Bottles line the shelves, portraits of singers and vibrant, ceramic fish cover the tiled walls, and strings of light twinkle.

Os Ferreiras, in the city's center, is a fado mainstay, owned by singers Antonio and Maria Helena Ferreira (fado is a genre of Portuguese music). A rotating roster of fadistas, including Artur Batalha and Julia Lopes, perform every Friday and Saturday night after 10 p.m.

A sleek space in the Amaliá Rodrigues garden of Parque and Michelin-starred chef Joachim Koerper’s ambitious Mediterranean menu cemented Eleven’s popularity from the moment it opened.

At this beachside restaurant you’ll find Asian-inflected Portuguese dishes such as crab risotto with avocado ice cream.

An extensive wine list accompanies chef Rui Paula’s modern Portuguese menu. Order the smoked duck breast with requeijão cheese and a glass of tinto as you eat on the waterfront deck. Lunch for two $109.


This restaurant on the water with views across the Tagus River, makes a nod to Mozambique—a former Portuguese colony—with piri-piri prawns and smoky Zambezi curries.

This venue is closed.