Portugal

Restaurants in Portugal

Lisbon boasts some of the best restaurants in Portugal. Although quiet during the week, reservations are a must at the Alcantara Cafe in Lisbon on the weekend. Serving both International and Portuguese cuisine the menu has something for foodies and fussy travelers alike. The codfish is a local favorite.

Fans of Portugal's traditional music should pull up chairs at Os Ferreiras, one of the city's Fado mainstays. Who knows, you might even witness a 'singing dual' where artists battle through difficult melodies and songs. Open since 1921, Cafe Majestic known for its mini French toasts or rabanadas used to be the center of political meetings in Porto. Beachfront Praia De Luz makes a mean steak in the northern town.

For traditional fare in Evora try the bean stew or pulsane soup at Fialho. Botequim da Mouraria wins the critics and locals choice award for authentic cuisine in the area, while Luar de Janeiro excels for its casual excellence and locally sourced produce. Other great restaurants in Portugal include Chef Sergi Arola's namesake in Sintra.

In the Algarve, Casa Velha set in a beautiful Portuguese farmhouse serves refined classics like rack of lamb and seafood casserole. If you visit one only of Portugal's restaurants make it Dos Pasos, a beachfront shack near Quinta De Lago. Make sure to get a side of African rice – a delicious staple on many of the areas beach menus.

Regional dishes are served on the patio, which has views of the Aquapura hotel’s vineyards.Lunch for two $125.

Hobnob with impeccably turned-out locals over thin-crust pizzas. The space manages to feel intimate despite its warehouse-like dimensions.

In the mostly commercial Uptown district of Lisbon is Luca, a contemporary, whitewashed dining space that uses Portuguese ingredients like black pork cheeks and prawns in traditional Italian pastas and risottos.

Stop by this 88-year-old spot for traditional rabanadas (mini French toast).

Head to this new spot for pan-Mediterranean fare, like linguine with local Serpa cheese and roasted walnuts.

Lisbon’s hippest restaurant—located at the docks and partly owned by actor John Malkovich—serves contemporary twists on Portuguese classics, such as codfish salad with chickpea ice cream. The retro-modern space is well suited to the forward-thinking food.

Don’t head back to Lisbon without stocking up on the local queijada pastry (made with goat cheese).

Tucked away up the stairs from the Travessa Terreiro do Trigo and down the San Miguel alley is the restaurant Santo Antonio de Alfama.

Since 1837, customers have been lining up outside the pastelaria next to the Heironymite monastery in Belem waiting for their pastel de Belem — a custard tart made with filo dough and sprinkled with cinnamon and sugar.

A popular restaurant that specializes in regional cuisine and wines from boutique vineyards. Lunch for two $70.