Hotels in Portugal

Portuguese architect Francisco Aires Mateus renovated a 1907 iron factory to create this affordable hotel. Keeping its exterior intact, he gutted the building to make way for Zen-like interiors.

Donatella and Pier Luigi Cavicchi opened Locanda Solomeo, the town’s only hotel and real restaurant. The Locanda is humble—everything, you might say, a Cucinelli pullover is not.

Located between the shopping of Chiado and the nightlife and eateries of Bairro Alto, the Bairro Alto Hotel is housed in an ocher, 19th-century baroque building that overlooks the Luis de Camoes square.

This 12th-century monastery turned inn, attached to a tiny church in a village of northern Portugal’s Gerês Mountains, retains its formidable Romanesque demeanor—right down to the stylishly austere bedrooms (former monk’s cells) and their extremely firm mattresses.

Traditionalists can book at this restored 18th-century town house with paned French doors and a subterranean pool and fitness center. It’s a 15-minute walk north from the central districts of Baixa and Alfama.

Great Value Near Douro National Park, a small inn that offers 12 comfortable rooms.

Northern Portugal’s dramatic Douro Valley wine region now has a resort to match. Vidago Palace, an hour’s drive northeast of historic Porto, is located in a Belle Époque mansion with 70 guest rooms decorated with Portuguese embellishments (hand-loomed rugs; traditional cement tiles).

The history of Lisbon itself is present in Palacio Belmonte: it has walls built during the Roman and Muslim occupations and 59 azulejos panels from 1725, and the main building was built in 1449.

Lawrence's Hotel, the oldest on the Iberian peninsula, is in the center of the small town of Sintra, about thirty minutes northwest of Lisbon via car.