Portugal

Hotels in Portugal

In Lisbon, old-world charms meet of-the-moment design, and the city’s Corinthia Hotel best captures these contrasting vibes. Built in 1983 and renovated twice (most recently in 2009), the spacious property now features jewel-toned interiors and a windowed façade.

This Manuel Salgado–designed property combines 50 stylish, color-blocked rooms and suites with a prime riverfront setting and proximity to the Belém Cultural Center.

Just south of the Douro Valley, Carmen and Paulo Romão have converted six stone structures into guesthouses with modern suites.

If you want to stay in the old part of town this boutique property has balconies overlooking the Douro River.

On this westernmost European archipelago, an abandoned 18th-century village of tumbledown stone cottages was renovated into a folksy rural getaway—lace curtains; iron beds with homemade quilts—against a jaw-dropping landscape.

Located in the quiet Lapa neighborhood, the York House hotel is a converted Carmelite convent built in 1606. The surrounding garden and terraces allow for relaxation but the National Museum of Ancient Art, the Rossio square, and the Castle of Sao Jorge are all nearby.

A simple 31-room hotel and restaurant constructed from a foundry and two 13th-century houses.

Portuguese architect Francisco Aires Mateus renovated a 1907 iron factory to create this affordable hotel. Keeping its exterior intact, he gutted the building to make way for Zen-like interiors.

Donatella and Pier Luigi Cavicchi opened Locanda Solomeo, the town’s only hotel and real restaurant. The Locanda is humble—everything, you might say, a Cucinelli pullover is not.

Located between the shopping of Chiado and the nightlife and eateries of Bairro Alto, the Bairro Alto Hotel is housed in an ocher, 19th-century baroque building that overlooks the Luis de Camoes square.