Hotels in Portugal

In Lisbon, old-world charms meet of-the-moment design, and the city’s Corinthia Hotel best captures these contrasting vibes. Built in 1983 and renovated twice (most recently in 2009), the spacious property now features jewel-toned interiors and a windowed façade.

The NH Liberdade portends a hip new Lisbon, with its rooftop swimming pool, black-and-cream motif, and provocative details (like the faux- fur lamp in the lobby). The centrally located hotel gives guests the personal treatment, down to a choice of pillows (firm, soft, feather).

The palazzo-style buildings of the Penha Longa Hotel and Golf resort overlook the lakes, forests, and mountains of Sintra. The monastery, built in 1355, now houses conference rooms and the 19th century palace with full-service spa treatment rooms and adorned with gazebos, waterfalls, and pools.

The hotel has a bull’s-eye central location in the historic hub and compact but sweet rooms papered in metallic Fortuny designs.

From the Portuguese for "butterfly lavender", Quinta Romaneira offers a teak-and-fiberglass launch for a cruise between the grassy banks. The 1,000-acre domain is now owned by a French consortium and has two handsome manors halfway down adjacent slopes on a bend in the river.

Located in a late 18th-century palace in bohemian Santos, the As Janelas Verdes hotel was home and inspiration to the Portuguese novelist Eca de Quieros.

About one hour's drive from Lisbon is Obidos, a well-preserved, walled medieval town built in 1282 and known for its cobblestone streets and white-washed, blue-trimmed houses. The town's 11th-century castle was converted into Pousada do Castelo in the 1950's, the first of its kind.

The glamour of the 1950’s is beautifully enshrined in this yellow-and-gray palace chock-full of Midcentury pieces. Bonus: the hotel has some of the largest standard rooms in the city (452 square feet).

The intimate hotel features eight light-filled rooms with large French windows and marble baths.

 Originally the 18th-century residence of the Dutch consul, the property opened as a hotel in the 1950’s. A Neoclassical building with frescoed rooms, gilded antiques, and famous guests (Catherine Deneuve; John Malkovich), the place had nevertheless seen better days.