Portland, OR

Portland, OR Travel Guide

A black awning and sidewalk tables greet visitors to Sarah Hart’s Spanish-inspired chocolate shop, promising “(mostly) sin free chocolate.” Alma is both "soul" in Spanish and refers to Hart’s grandmother, who taught her to bake.

Plenty of passersby walk by this tranquil sanctuary (which was built in 2000 atop a parking lot) without even noticing it’s there; one doesn’t expect to find a garden amid the concrete and bustle of Old Town.

An offbeat mix of students, progressive political activists, hippies, and young professionals inhabits this East Side neighborhood. Its main drag, Hawthorne Boulevard, is lined with teahouses, hemp shops, and vegetarian cafés.

Creations like a celery-spiked gin fizz and more than 200 spirits complement chef Jack Yoss’s seasonal New American bar snacks. These include a tasty chorizo burger with pickled shallots and a fried egg.

Since the construction in 2005 of a new wing, the Pacific Northwest’s oldest art museum has really become two facilities in one.

Original Debut: In 1927, Universal Studios spent $100,000 (big bucks in those days) bankrolling the Bagdad Theater in Portland’s Hawthorne District.

“Keep Portland Weird” read bumper stickers around town. Spend any time in Pioneer Courthouse Square and you'll find that it's ground zero for the alternative lifestyle embraced by the city.

The Portland Opera is known for presenting not only supertitled operas but also Broadway shows on tour. Additionally, their creative and skillfully made scenery and costumes are rented by other opera companies.

A collectively run coffeehouse lousy with laptop beatniks conforming in their devotion to the fight-the-power manifestos the management has posted on placards: We Want to be an Example of an Ethical, Nonhierarchial, Worker-Run Operation.

Take an afternoon or evening walk along the roughly six-block, gallery-and-café-dotted stretch of the Mississippi Avenue Arts District.

Expecting parents Sara Chun and Ben Cavalcanti opened their Portland-based online shop in 2008 to sell kitty-shaped crayons that are easy for infants to grip and made with sustainable materials, including soy and beeswax.

A high-ceilinged, airy spot set amid the loading docks and chic galleries of the Pearl District, Bluehour is run by the same team behind chic eatery Clarklewis.