Portland, OR

Restaurants in Portland, OR

From traditional cuisine to wildly creative menus, plus large quantities of the organic, farm-to-table fare that’s become synonymous with the city, Portland restaurants offer eclectic dining opportunities as well as modern twists on traditional dishes, sure to satisfy even the most discerning foodies. At Pok Pok, James Beard Award-winning chef Andy Ricker serves up a fusion menu inspired by classic Thai cuisine and served in a trendy, low-key environment. Locals’ favorites include Vietnamese chicken wings, boar collar, and Thai noodle soups. Castagna, on Hawthorne Boulevard, takes the farm-to-table ethos very seriously: Chef Justin Woodward forages greens and flowers from Portland’s surrounding woods himself, and serves them up in an molecular style that will blow the lid off your classic salad. Just try not to Instagram each course of Woodward’s inspired tasting menu.

For a dash of rustic-chic, visit Ned Ludd, a Portland restaurant where everything is cooked in a wood-fired oven, including the salads. Chef Jason French’s menu includes whole roasted trout, pork noodles made entirely from pork fat, and a variety of pizzas, all cooked in the wood oven, of course. Portland’s favorite meal – brunch – gets a makeover at Tasty ‘N Sons, with a massive family-style menu comprising dishes from around globe. Some of this Portland hotspot’s best dishes include shakshuka with merguez sausage, steak and eggs with corncakes, spaghetti carbornara, grilled lamb chops, and polenta and sausage ragu.

The sweet, redheaded, and tattooed Kir Jensen serves cupcakes from her cart of desserts.The "Amy Winehouse" cupcake is soaked in brandy and comes topped with a straw and "bump" of powdered sugar.

This key cog in Portland’s movement of market-driven, farm-to-table restaurants opened in 2004 near the Willamette River's eastern banks, honoring the two American pioneers. The industrial space includes roll-up garage doors and exposed ductwork.

Chef Greg Higgins has helped to set the standard for local and sustainable cooking at his eponymous restaurant near Portland State University. The long, lean, glass-fronted restaurant has twin dining rooms, divided by a semi-open kitchen touting raw materials like whole hams.

Before IHOP, there was Original. In downtown Portland, this is the original Original location of the national franchise now famous for its air-filled, oven-baked Dutch Baby pancake, which resembles a sugar-powdered volcanic crater slightly smaller than Mount St. Helens.

This glass-fronted restaurant—named for a coastal city in northwest Italy—resides in a single-level, brick building in Southeast Portland.

This northeast Portland newcomer isn’t so much a restaurant as a regularly occurring, eccentric dinner party in chef and co-owner Naomi Pomeroy’s exhibition kitchen. Dining is at a pair of communal tables, and there are just two seatings per evening (plus brunch on Sundays).

Opened by Domenick “Nick” Carlacio, this hot dog emporium is now owned by Tyler Rogoway. The shop still sells its popular coney: an all-beef hot dog topped with seasoned ground beef sauce, onions, and American cheese.

A small-scale, pure-hearted restaurant that has no stove. What it’s got is a wood-burning oven inherited from the space’s last incarnation, a short-lived pizza joint.

Situated in the Kerns neighborhood, this small Mediterranean bistro contains a bar area with banquette seating, a dining room with art-lined walls, and six counter seats overlooking an exhibition kitchen.

Located in an art-lined basement with communal tables in a building east of the Willamette River, this restaurant sprouted from a charcuterie and butcher shop called Viande Meats and Sausage and focuses on comfort food crafted from local, seasonal ingredients.

This American brasserie and bar in Portland’s Pearl District has a green and glass front and limited seating on a railed-in former loading dock, whlie the interior has wood floors, art-lined walls, and an active bar.

A relatively new (2007) addition to Portland’s burgeoning East Side food scene, this smart and unpretentious tapas restaurant brightens an otherwise quiet street with its inviting ruby-red walls and polished dark wood tables.