Hotels in Phoenix

The feeling here is not exactly remote desert oasis, but you will find lush, sprawling grounds and a peaceful lake that offers relaxing gondola rides.

On the ceiling of the resort's east-facing lobby, there are 10 Native American murals—an example of the cultural touches designed to reflect the local Pima and Maricopa heritages.

After a five-year, $90 million makeover, The Phoenician—Scottsdale’s grande dame resort—has reemerged triumphant. The 643-room complex’s aesthetic now fuses 19thcentury Europe with a dash of Southwestern flair.

Situated amid rose gardens, cacti, and citrus trees, the Wigwam (which was founded by the Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company) has been a wonder for golfers since the first nine-hole course was built in 1930.

A stay at W lets guests experience their "Whatever Whenever" motto. That means the W will give you what you want, when you want, such as a sunrise over Camelback Mountain, a personalized treatment in the Bliss spa, or a private dinner on your balcony.

Phoenix’s grande dame was built in the 1920’s by disciples of Frank Lloyd Wright, and the place feels like someone transplanted it from, say, Pasadena.

If you’re looking for hustle and bustle, go elsewhere: this Four Seasons outpost is tucked up against some of the remotest desert in town. Opened in 1999, it’s already undergone a $17 million renovation.

Jeff Vadheim—the chatty, affable proprietor of this guesthouse—will tell you everything you need to know (and then some) about the history of the only official B&B in the city of Phoenix.

Book a villa at this 1,300-acre resort that includes 36 holes of championship golf, superb tennis, and six restaurants. In the spa enjoy the site-appropriate treatments like the turquoise body wrap, which involves honey, blue cornmeal, and a rain stick.

In 2004, Westroc Hotels & Resorts saved this old motor inn from the wrecking ball, and today the vibe is Rat Pack for the 21st century. The owners preserved the 1956 architecture (designed by Edward L.

The lobby of this artsy hotel is snow-white and every room contains a perfect red apple.

Though Arizona’s Fountain Hills suburb is less familiar to travelers than the Phoenix/Scottsdale area 17 miles to the southwest, the Inn at Eagle Mountain delivers a golf experience that rivals the city’s well-known resorts.

Located a stone’s throw from the 18-hole Stadium Course, which hosts Phoenix’s only PGA tournament, this Fairmont hotel is popular with golf enthusiasts as well as families and couples who relax by the pool, unwind at the award-winning Willow Stream Spa, and dine at restaurants by notable chefs M