Phoenix

Things to do in Phoenix

Some of the most popular things to do in Phoenix involve exploring its desert landscape. Hikers can reach a panoramic view of the city along Camelback Mountain's red rock-rimmed hiking trails. Or, for a closer look, visit the Desert Botanical Garden, home to countless species of colorful plants.

Art lovers can add the Bentley Projects to a list of what to do in Phoenix. The downtown warehouse district features many of the city's top galleries, displaying avant-garde pieces by its top local artists. Guided art walks are also held each month.

The resorts themselves boast many headliners when it comes things to do in Phoenix. The area is home to many a world-class golf course, along with upscale spas and fine dining options.

For a look at local history, be sure to include stops in Old Town Scottsdale and downtown's Heritage Square on your list of what to do in Phoenix. Both are anchored by well-preserved Victorian structures and local history museums.

Three-day rafting trips along the Colorado River, from $725 per person.

Instead of a poolside lounge or round of golf, visit Frank Lloyd Wright’s former studio and retreat (now home to the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation). Daily guided tours are kept small and last from one to three hours.

During spring training, metro Phoenix is all about baseball, with several small ballparks offering action; but the best little one is this home away from home for the San Francisco Giants.

Torch-lit tiki lounge

Both the Seattle Mariners and the San Diego Padres hold their spring training in Peoria, Arizona's Sports Complex. The complex features a main stadium, six practice fields for the Mariners, and six practice fields for the Padres.

Established in 1987 by Kimber Lanning, Stinkweeds is an independently owned music shop specializing in local, indie, and imported tunes by such artists as Zach Condon, Feist, Mastodon, and Alberta Cross.

This 16,000-acre expanse may be the largest municipal park in the country, but you won’t find any softball fields or grassy concert venues here.

In an effort to lure non-museum types, this trendsetting institution began sponsoring SMoCA Nights a few years back.

You know what they say about casinos—once you’re inside, day and night blend and time stops. Same goes for the ones that ring metro Phoenix, so choose by location.

Hybrid drinking, dining and retail-clothing space

Built in 1964 and christened by Willie Mays (who hit the first spring training home run there) Phoenix Municipal Stadium is more than home to the Oakland A’s spring training. This 8,000-seater includes media facilities, party suites, a media level patio, and a picnic area.

A favorite among well-to-do housewives and their teenage daughters, this boutique stocks an irresistible mix of new jewelry, body products, and garden accessories, plus fanciful greeting cards and Japanese stickers.

The City of Phoenix estimates that this summit’s trail is one of the most heavily used in the country; it draws an estimated 4,000 to 10,000 hikers per week.

The Pointe Hilton Tapatio Cliffs resort is tucked into the hills of Shaw Butte, which affords incredible views of the Sonoran desert and the lights of Phoenix. The Mission-style buildings contain 584 two-room suites with subtle Southwestern accents, such as earth tones and adobe fireplaces.

Here you can hike deep into the desert without leaving a paved path or proximity to a cold drink.