Philadelphia

Restaurants in Philadelphia

Philadelphia restaurants combine both the buzziest names in the food world alongside some of its greasiest traditions. Many celebrity chef-fronted Philadelphia restaurants, like Stephen Starr's Buddakan, Morimoto and El Vez have opened up second locations in New York City. The Philadelphia-based La Colombe Torrefaction coffee chain now runs a shop in South Korea.

For spicy Mexican dishes in a colorful setting, visit Jose Garces' Distrito. It has earned its reputation as one of the best restaurants in Philadelphia with upscale takes on south-of-the-border street food, such as Kobe beef tacos, and a bar boasting more than 100 tequilas.

Some of the most iconic restaurants in Philadelphia are its cheesesteak purveyors. Visit the home of the beloved fried onion and Cheese Wiz-topped sandwich at the Pat's King of Steaks takeout window, or visit Geno's Steaks at East Passyunk Crossing, whose bright neon lights attract crowds of late-night fans and a worldwide reputation.

Known all over the world, Geno's has been a pioneer of that greasy tradition, the Philly cheesesteak, since 1966.

This British-style pub in the Art Museum District offers indoor and (in season) outdoor seating.

Although he worked in several acclaimed local kitchens, it wasn’t until Israeli-born chef Michael Solomonov did it his way at Zahav that he achieved national regard, winning the 2011 James Beard Award for Best Chef in the Mid-Atlantic.

Tony Luke, Jr. founded his South Philly sandwich eatery in 1992 and put a gourmet twist on his hometown’s traditional cheese steak.

With locations now in Atlantic City, Washington, D.C., and Orlando, Cuba Libre's original Philadelphia branch is situated in a nightlife-heavy strip of Old City. Its interior resembles an old Havana street scene.

Pod

Restaurateur Stephen Starr opened this pan-Asian restaurant, designing the interior with futuristic neon-lights and cylinder-shaped dining booths called pods that seat six to 12 and illuminate with bright colors that can be changed with an inside switch.

Housed on the first two floors of a 1907 Victorian mansion, this University City restaurant is well-loved for its BYOB policy and its ever-changing menu of creative New American cuisine.

On Walnut Street in Rittenhouse Square, the Hollywood of old appears anew in Butcher and Singer's blending elegant gilt, marble, and golden chandeliers with quirky touches like a dressed-up dogs mural.

It wouldn’t be Philly without a cheese steak, so lay on the Cheese Wiz at this iconic restaurant. “Pat” is Pat Olivieri—the South Philly hot dog vendor who’s credited with inventing the Philly cheesesteak (with his brother Harry) back in 1920.

Southwark’s owners source their ingredients from local farmers, co-ops, and often even from their own gardens, supporting the sustainable Slow Food movement. Small plates include artisan cheeses and house-made sausage, while locally caught quail and trout can be found on the entrée menu.

Chef Georges Perrier opened Le Bec-Fin in 1970, growing the restaurant to be one of the finest French dining rooms in the United States.