Peru

Peru Travel Guide

Visitors wondering what to do in Peru will be hard pressed to run out of options. The country is bursting with activities to discover, food to sample, and sights to take in. Plan on setting aside some time to trek the Inca Trail, a four-day hike that culminates at Machu Picchu and offers sweeping views of the country’s breathtaking topography. The country is a great place for adventure lovers. There are plenty of things to do in Peru that will get your adrenaline pumping, including zip-lining through the jungle, horseback riding on the beach, and biking through the mountains.

For those looking for a less physically taxing vacation, there are plenty of things to do in Peru that don’t require you to break a sweat. The city’s urban centers – primarily its capital, Lima – boast a lively cultural scene, complete with museums featuring local art, crafts fairs and bars and nightclubs. Foodies wondering what to do in Peru are also in luck – the country’s indigenous cuisine is varied and delicious. Don’t leave without sampling ceviche, and as many of the country’s famous desserts as you can get your hands-on.

Ester Ventura sells intriguing gold and silver jewelry that incorporates seeds, weavings, seashells, coral, and pre-Columbian fragments.

Bargain for clay vessels and ponchos at the sprawling daily market. This is the place to find deals on inexpensive souvenirs.

Located in quiet Pueblo Libre, this museum is known for its unusual collection of erotic pottery, made more than 1,300 years ago.

The company arranges tours through peru.

Years as agent: 15. Specialties: Peru, Bolivia, Ecuador, Galápagos. Consultation fee: $250.

Stock up on colorful and reasonably-priced sweaters, knee-length coats, and scarves, all made from downy-soft Peruvian alpaca wool sourced in the Andes.

A minor basilica and museum, this Lima Baroque church was inaugurated in 1672 and is best known for its large system of catacombs. Uncovered in 1943, the subterranean passageways contain hundreds of thousands of bones, some of which are arranged in elaborate geometric patterns.

Open since 1821, the hotel proudly declares that the pisco sour was invented here. True or not, the bartenders serve up a very good version of the drink—made from limes, pisco (a grape brandy), and foamy egg whites—in a wood-paneled room.

The new program on Anapia ensures islanders benefit from travel homestays.

Spend time between Lima, the Sacred Valley, and Machu Picchu learning from culinary masters. You will make ceviche, or chopped fish with lime juice and spices, and cook pachamanca, or a meat dish, in an earthen oven—all while benefiting local artisans and organic farmers.

The Church of San Pedro Apóstol de Andahuaylillas, sometimes called the Sistine Chapel of the Americas, is currently undergoing restorations with the help of the World Monuments Fund.

With pieces made from materials both expected (Amazonian wood carvings) and unusual (recycled tin-can mobiles), the emphasis here is on contemporary artisans. An excellent selection of silver jewelry is displayed in one of the converted mansion's front rooms.

The alpaca in most sweaters is blended with either llama fur (which can smell unpleasant when wet) or synthetic fibers, so it's worth paying extra for quality. Find the real thing in a rainbow of colors at this chain; the Miraflores location has the largest selection in town.