Peru Travel Guide

Spend time between Lima, the Sacred Valley, and Machu Picchu learning from culinary masters. You will make ceviche, or chopped fish with lime juice and spices, and cook pachamanca, or a meat dish, in an earthen oven—all while benefiting local artisans and organic farmers.

The Church of San Pedro Apóstol de Andahuaylillas, sometimes called the Sistine Chapel of the Americas, is currently undergoing restorations with the help of the World Monuments Fund.

With pieces made from materials both expected (Amazonian wood carvings) and unusual (recycled tin-can mobiles), the emphasis here is on contemporary artisans. An excellent selection of silver jewelry is displayed in one of the converted mansion's front rooms.

The alpaca in most sweaters is blended with either llama fur (which can smell unpleasant when wet) or synthetic fibers, so it's worth paying extra for quality. Find the real thing in a rainbow of colors at this chain; the Miraflores location has the largest selection in town.

The pre-Columbian brick ruins can't compare with Machu Picchu and Cuzco, but the location—in the middle of a modern cityscape—has a surreal appeal.

Celine Cousteau will lead a small group of travelers on an expedition around the Peruvian Amazon for luxury outfitter Butterfield & Robinson.

Up-and-coming jewelry designer Anna Dannon creates the imaginative silver baubles sold at this shop on the lively Álvarez Calderón. You’ll find everything from sculptural cube-shaped necklaces to thick, gold-dipped arm cuffs.

Owner Mari Solari stocks her shop, which doubles as her residence, with handicrafts from around the country.

Two courtyards filled with everything from wood beads and strung seed necklaces to gourds carved with scenes of village life. Open every day, it's the smaller, more convenient equivalent of the Mercado Indio.

Ancient silver vessels and stone idols fill one wing; the other provides a survey of more recent history.

The company arranges tours through Peru.

Site of a 15th-century Inca town made mostly of mud bricks, yet of phenomenal size, the towering columns of its Wiracocha temple built to support what is believed to have been the biggest roof in pre-Columbian America.

Claudia makes the most unusual necklaces, bracelets, and rings from velvet-covered wire twisted in strange shapes and dyed an amazing array of colors, which she sells at a nearby shop of her own.