Peru

Peru Travel Guide

The alpaca in most sweaters is blended with either llama fur (which can smell unpleasant when wet) or synthetic fibers, so it's worth paying extra for quality. Find the real thing in a rainbow of colors at this chain; the Miraflores location has the largest selection in town.

The pre-Columbian brick ruins can't compare with Machu Picchu and Cuzco, but the location—in the middle of a modern cityscape—has a surreal appeal.

Celine Cousteau will lead a small group of travelers on an expedition around the Peruvian Amazon for luxury outfitter Butterfield & Robinson.

As rain forests worldwide diminish, there’s no better time to explore the world’s largest remaining tropical rain forest, along the Amazon River.

Up-and-coming jewelry designer Anna Dannon creates the imaginative silver baubles sold at this shop on the lively Álvarez Calderón. You’ll find everything from sculptural cube-shaped necklaces to thick, gold-dipped arm cuffs.

Owner Mari Solari stocks her shop, which doubles as her residence, with handicrafts from around the country.

Two courtyards filled with everything from wood beads and strung seed necklaces to gourds carved with scenes of village life. Open every day, it's the smaller, more convenient equivalent of the Mercado Indio.

Ancient silver vessels and stone idols fill one wing; the other provides a survey of more recent history.

More distinctive than the touristed Plaza Mayor is the Palacio de Torre Tagle, a former marquis' mansion. Completed around 1735, its stone arches and airy inner courtyard reference Moorish Spain and are reminiscent of buildings in Andalusia.

The company arranges tours through Peru.

Site of a 15th-century Inca town made mostly of mud bricks, yet of phenomenal size, the towering columns of its Wiracocha temple built to support what is believed to have been the biggest roof in pre-Columbian America.

Claudia makes the most unusual necklaces, bracelets, and rings from velvet-covered wire twisted in strange shapes and dyed an amazing array of colors, which she sells at a nearby shop of her own.

The magnificent recently restored mansion of Don Pedro de Osma y Pardo is yet another place to see a rich variety of art and artifacts. Built around 1900, the house was once a stage for the grand lives of Peru's aristocrats.

With a glass of wine in hand, watch the sun drop into the Pacific from one of four windowed rooms in this Victorian-style complex on a pier.