Hotels in Peru

The bright yellow and orange lobby with formal mirrors and Peruvian murals of market scenes welcomes guests at this 1940s-built Arequipa hotel. Its 88 guest rooms are outfitted with caramel leather chairs, flat-screen televisions, and intricately carved headboards.

At the foot of Machu Picchu and on the banks of Vilcanota River, Sumaq Machu Picchu Hotel is a 60 room, family-owned hotel. Dedicated to serving exotic and unusual cuisine blending the flavors of South Peru, the hotel is a testament to everything worth discovering in this remarkable locale.

The exceptionality of Marriott's Lima property is apparent from a distance: it’s housed in an eye-catching 25-story glass tower that was built, optical illusion-style, by the US-based Arquitectonica to resemble an enormous arch.

This cheery hotel offers an agreeable combination of comfort and convenience—and spectacular views of the Pisac ruins. The buildings are a rainbow of mustard yellow, tomato red, and turquoise; the chapel is painted a deep rose.

This regal 79-room property sits right off of Trujillo’s main historic square. Rooms are small but well appointed with rich carved beds and flat-screen televisions. Opt for one of the six suites with generous sitting-room space (some have balconies with carved colonial screens).

In the Andean capital of Cuzco, this 16th-century former Jesuit seminary—a relic of Spanish colonial architecture with two landscaped courtyards and covered arcades—has been transformed by Orient-Express Hotels.

Urban efficiency and modern design aren't usually associated with a UNESCO World Heritage site, but Sumaq (Quechua for excellent or beautiful) is pulling off both. Half of the 60 orange-and-white rooms have balconies overlooking the river; the other 30 have big windows facing the mountains.

A façade decorated with eucalyptus branches marks the entrance to Inkaterra's 2010 property, a more affordable alternative to the group's Machu Picchu Pueblo Hotel.

From the arcaded slate lobby to the exposed ancient Inca wall in the atmospheric Rumi Bar, this historic city-hotel echoes the impressive Koricancha (Incan temple to the sun), with its unique stone features, located just across the street.

The 1927 Country Club is where France’s former president Charles de Gaulle once spent the night. The colonial-style building has been converted into the 83-room hotel filled with Peruvian art from Lima’s Museo Pedro de Osma, brocade-covered chairs, gilt mirrors, and mahogany armoires.

Inkaterra's Machu Picchu lodge, nestled in the cloud forest below the Incan ruins, is a welcoming, sustainability-focused hotel a short bus ride from the famed archeological site.

Everything feels oversize here. Whitewashed arches tower above wide porches. King-size beds and massive armoires don't begin to fill the vast rooms. Although San José is a simple hotel, its amenities—an attractive pool, tasty food, and pleasant service—add flair.

Located in the heart of the Sacred Valley, one hour from Cusco, this leisure hotel (which opened in 2010) features eco-inspired décor of thatched reeds, light woods, and woven furniture. The 128 rooms have gorgeous views of the Andes and Vilcanota River.