Peru

Hotels in Peru

Most hotels in Peru are relatively inexpensive. The county is a good place to travel on a budget, and it’s possible to book a shared room at many Peru hotels for less than $10 a night, while private rooms at 2 and even 3 star establishments can be booked for as little as $30 a night. If booked far enough in advance, it’s even possible to find a room at a cushy five star hotel for less than $70 a night.

There are also a number of internationally renowned five-star hotels in Peru located in the country’s major urban centers. Vacationers looking for the ultimate luxury Peruvian getaway should check out the Country Club Lima Hotel. Considered to be one of the best hotels in Peru, the Country Club Lima hotel is housed in a 1927 building constructed in the Spanish tradition, with wood beam ceilings and colorful tiled floors. The hotel boasts an array of amenities, including an outdoor pool, full-service spa and restaurant that serves a daily breakfast buffet complete with Peruvian delicacies.

Adjacent to the Paracas Nature Reserve on Peru’s central coast, this resort hotel offers beach views of the protected reserve’s coastline. The 120 bright and spacious rooms feature bamboo walls, decorative Incan textiles, and private terraces.

Surrounded by gnarled olive trees, this Sonesta hotel is located in a quiet residential neighborhood, just a 15-minute walk from Lima Golf Club and the ancient Huaca Huallamarca pyramid.

Stay in one of the 4-star bungalows.

Here, chef Virgilio Martínez Véliz delivers a tasting menu that includes updated Peruvian classics such as braised baby goat leg with herbs from his rooftop garden.

The bright yellow and orange lobby with formal mirrors and Peruvian murals of market scenes welcomes guests at this 1940s-built Arequipa hotel. Its 88 guest rooms are outfitted with caramel leather chairs, flat-screen televisions, and intricately carved headboards.

At the foot of Machu Picchu and on the banks of Vilcanota River, Sumaq Machu Picchu Hotel is a 60 room, family-owned hotel. Dedicated to serving exotic and unusual cuisine blending the flavors of South Peru, the hotel is a testament to everything worth discovering in this remarkable locale.

The exceptionality of Marriott's Lima property is apparent from a distance: it’s housed in an eye-catching 25-story glass tower that was built, optical illusion-style, by the US-based Arquitectonica to resemble an enormous arch.

This cheery hotel offers an agreeable combination of comfort and convenience—and spectacular views of the Pisac ruins. The buildings are a rainbow of mustard yellow, tomato red, and turquoise; the chapel is painted a deep rose.

This regal 79-room property sits right off of Trujillo’s main historic square. Rooms are small but well appointed with rich carved beds and flat-screen televisions. Opt for one of the six suites with generous sitting-room space (some have balconies with carved colonial screens).

In the Andean capital of Cuzco, this 16th-century former Jesuit seminary—a relic of Spanish colonial architecture with two landscaped courtyards and covered arcades—has been transformed by Orient-Express Hotels.

Urban efficiency and modern design aren't usually associated with a UNESCO World Heritage site, but Sumaq (Quechua for excellent or beautiful) is pulling off both. Half of the 60 orange-and-white rooms have balconies overlooking the river; the other 30 have big windows facing the mountains.

A façade decorated with eucalyptus branches marks the entrance to Inkaterra's 2010 property, a more affordable alternative to the group's Machu Picchu Pueblo Hotel.