Peru

Things to do in Peru

Visitors wondering what to do in Peru will be hard pressed to run out of options. The country is bursting with activities to discover, food to sample, and sights to take in. Plan on setting aside some time to trek the Inca Trail, a four-day hike that culminates at Machu Picchu and offers sweeping views of the country’s breathtaking topography. The country is a great place for adventure lovers. There are plenty of things to do in Peru that will get your adrenaline pumping, including zip-lining through the jungle, horseback riding on the beach, and biking through the mountains.

For those looking for a less physically taxing vacation, there are plenty of things to do in Peru that don’t require you to break a sweat. The city’s urban centers – primarily its capital, Lima – boast a lively cultural scene, complete with museums featuring local art, crafts fairs and bars and nightclubs. Foodies wondering what to do in Peru are also in luck – the country’s indigenous cuisine is varied and delicious. Don’t leave without sampling ceviche, and as many of the country’s famous desserts as you can get your hands-on.

Ester Ventura sells intriguing gold and silver jewelry that incorporates seeds, weavings, seashells, coral, and pre-Columbian fragments.

The company arranges tours through peru.

Years as agent: 15. Specialties: Peru, Bolivia, Ecuador, Galápagos. Consultation fee: $250.

Open since 1821, the hotel proudly declares that the pisco sour was invented here. True or not, the bartenders serve up a very good version of the drink—made from limes, pisco (a grape brandy), and foamy egg whites—in a wood-paneled room.

With pieces made from materials both expected (Amazonian wood carvings) and unusual (recycled tin-can mobiles), the emphasis here is on contemporary artisans. An excellent selection of silver jewelry is displayed in one of the converted mansion's front rooms.

Celine Cousteau will lead a small group of travelers on an expedition around the Peruvian Amazon for luxury outfitter Butterfield & Robinson.

As rain forests worldwide diminish, there’s no better time to explore the world’s largest remaining tropical rain forest, along the Amazon River.

Two courtyards filled with everything from wood beads and strung seed necklaces to gourds carved with scenes of village life. Open every day, it's the smaller, more convenient equivalent of the Mercado Indio.

Claudia makes the most unusual necklaces, bracelets, and rings from velvet-covered wire twisted in strange shapes and dyed an amazing array of colors, which she sells at a nearby shop of her own.

Visit the home of a Peruvian family in the weaving community of Huilloc, in the northern Ollantaytambo region. Villagers here still speak the centuries-old native language, and grow maize and potatoes on terraced plots 12,000 feet above sea level.

Everyone, from businessmen to students, starts their evening at this Miraflores institution overlooking the neighborhood's main park. Try a Cusque—a beer or a strong cup of coffee.

Peru turns out the world’s best pisco—a grape-based liquor—and this pocket-size store stocks excellent bottles such as La Blanco Mostoverde Gran Herencia ($60), arguably the country’s finest.

The Ica Desert of Peru was once the thriving seafloor of an ancient ocean. Today, it’s one of the driest places on the planet and among the best fossil-hunting grounds ever found.