Peru

Things to do in Peru

Visitors wondering what to do in Peru will be hard pressed to run out of options. The country is bursting with activities to discover, food to sample, and sights to take in. Plan on setting aside some time to trek the Inca Trail, a four-day hike that culminates at Machu Picchu and offers sweeping views of the country’s breathtaking topography. The country is a great place for adventure lovers. There are plenty of things to do in Peru that will get your adrenaline pumping, including zip-lining through the jungle, horseback riding on the beach, and biking through the mountains.

For those looking for a less physically taxing vacation, there are plenty of things to do in Peru that don’t require you to break a sweat. The city’s urban centers – primarily its capital, Lima – boast a lively cultural scene, complete with museums featuring local art, crafts fairs and bars and nightclubs. Foodies wondering what to do in Peru are also in luck – the country’s indigenous cuisine is varied and delicious. Don’t leave without sampling ceviche, and as many of the country’s famous desserts as you can get your hands-on.

Located in quiet Pueblo Libre, this museum is known for its unusual collection of erotic pottery, made more than 1,300 years ago.

A minor basilica and museum, this Lima Baroque church was inaugurated in 1672 and is best known for its large system of catacombs. Uncovered in 1943, the subterranean passageways contain hundreds of thousands of bones, some of which are arranged in elaborate geometric patterns.

The Church of San Pedro Apóstol de Andahuaylillas, sometimes called the Sistine Chapel of the Americas, is currently undergoing restorations with the help of the World Monuments Fund.

Spend time between Lima, the Sacred Valley, and Machu Picchu learning from culinary masters. You will make ceviche, or chopped fish with lime juice and spices, and cook pachamanca, or a meat dish, in an earthen oven—all while benefiting local artisans and organic farmers.

The pre-Columbian brick ruins can't compare with Machu Picchu and Cuzco, but the location—in the middle of a modern cityscape—has a surreal appeal.

Owner Mari Solari stocks her shop, which doubles as her residence, with handicrafts from around the country.

The company arranges tours through Peru.

Site of a 15th-century Inca town made mostly of mud bricks, yet of phenomenal size, the towering columns of its Wiracocha temple built to support what is believed to have been the biggest roof in pre-Columbian America.

With a glass of wine in hand, watch the sun drop into the Pacific from one of four windowed rooms in this Victorian-style complex on a pier.

The store sells the Peruvian delicacy called teja, try the one made of candied lemons stuffed with dulce de leche and dipped in sugar.

Claiming to be “curators of unique experiences,” Orient-Express is known for offering the most exclusive railway journeys in the world, and today the company helps plan one-of-a-kind adventures in more than 23 countries around the globe.

The Inca sites around the edges of town are spectacular, especially the intimidating stone ramparts of Sacsayhuaman.

Drop by the Brujas de Cachiche restaurant's bar for jazz, folk, and traditional dance performances. The cocktail menu, full of fruit-flavored variations on the pisco sour, takes the drink in daring directions with grape and passion-fruit versions.

Ester Ventura sells intriguing gold and silver jewelry that incorporates seeds, weavings, seashells, coral, and pre-Columbian fragments.

The company arranges tours through peru.