Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania Travel Guide

For three days in July, watch ragged “soldiers” fight the bloody Battle of Gettysburg— celebrating its 150th anniversary in 2012—with cannons and bayonets. On your way out, grab a commemorative coffee mug or baseball cap at the Civil War store.

Run by people of Mennonite and Amish descent, the tour takes you through the covered bridges of the Dutch German countryside to visit noncommercial working farms.

Cocktail lover's wine bar

Since 2004, this Northern Liberties-area art gallery has showcased contemporary artists who incorporate unusual materials — from found objects to 3-D installations — into their works. The bi-level space houses several exhibitions at any given time.

Recently restored by its new owners, Chick’s maintains the original pressed-tin ceiling and cherry bar, and features great classic-inspired cocktails.

Next door to the Country Pie Shoppe, this old-fashioned space stocks penny candy, fudge, and handmade wooden toys.

Climb through “Nature’s Castles,” three large-scale treehouses designed to bring back your childhood memories and built among (although not attached to) large tulip poplars at Longwood Gardens, eight miles north in Kennett Square.

Hauled by steam locomotives, this 45-minute train loops through a pastoral strip of Lancaster County, from Strasburg to Leaman Place Junction and back. Working farms, many of them Amish, make up the bulk of the scenery.

At the Crayola Factory, where crayons have been made since 1903, revisit retired colors (raw umber, we hardly knew you), and take home a four-color souvenir box made before your eyes.

 A favorite professional dealers’ source for Midcentury furniture.

Insider Clout: Berghaier, a wildlife specialist before becoming a travel consultant, has been following the Great Migration for more than three decades. He'll examine your travel dates and budget to book you the best possible camp for seeing it.

Located between Chestnut and Walnut Streets, this family-run gelato shop uses hormone-free milk from grass-fed cows to make its chilled Italian dessert, which has about half the fat of ice cream.

Because of PNC Park’s orientation on the banks of the Allegheny River, most fans enjoy a sweeping panorama of Roberto Clemente Bridge.

A more casual sister restaurant to next-door Fork Bistro, this Old City café is part sit-down dining, with the few tables overlooking Market Street, and part carry-out counter. The food at both components focuses on artisanal and health-conscious choices.