Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania Travel Guide

For three days in July, watch ragged “soldiers” fight the bloody Battle of Gettysburg— celebrating its 150th anniversary in 2012—with cannons and bayonets. On your way out, grab a commemorative coffee mug or baseball cap at the Civil War store.

A cross-city sister to the Old City Continental martini bar, restauranteur Stephen Starr launched this Rittenhouse Square restaurant/lounge in 2004.

Take a float trip down the Delaware River and watch for nesting bald eagles.

Relive Gettysburg from a soldier’s perspective, on a one-to-four-hour horseback tour.

One-stop shop for fashion, body, home, and food in a converted ice factory. Products are sourced from artisans and fair-trade companies in over 40 developing countries.

This hilly Phoenix coaster dates from 1947, and the nearly finished Flying Turns is an open-chute toboggan. Among the park’s more than 50 rides, there are also classics like retro bumper cars and a creepy haunted house.

Where the Allegheny and Monongahela meet to form the Ohio River, 22 miles of riverside paths wind throughout the city limits—and are best explored by bike.

With four decades’ experience, Frontiers offers a huge range of trips to some of the most exotic fishing spots on six continents. T+L Trip Pick Bahamas: Delphi Club on Abaco Island.

Behind the 19th-century Beaux-Arts facade, the Penn Museum on the University of Pennsylvania campus houses three floors of artifacts from around the world.

In addition to the 2008 World Championship trophy, Citizens Bank Park is home to Ashburn Alley, an open-air promenade with concessions, bull pen–viewing platforms, and the Phillies Wall of Fame.

A retail home for local cheesemakers, tea makers, and gourmet gift basket assemblers, DiBruno Bros now has several locations since opening its South Philly flagship in 1939 on Ninth Street, where the shelves are still stocked with rare, local, and international cheeses and meats (some hang from t

Anthony's, a wooden storefront located in Philadelphia's Ninth Street Italian Market, opened in the 1930s. The environment is Old World, with small, marble-topped tables, dark-wood wainscoting, and tall, wooden shelves stocked with sacks of coffee and baskets of cellophane-wrapped candies.