Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania Travel Guide

From characteristic must-see attractions to local hot spots, you won’t be left wondering what to do in Pennsylvania. There’s plenty to do whether you’re there for a romantic weekend getaway or a family trip. Sports fans will especially appreciate the state. There are plenty of passionate fans of hometown favorites like the Philadelphia Phillies and Pittsburgh Pirates (baseball), the Philadelphia Eagles and Pittsburgh Steelers (football), and the Philadelphia Flyers and Pittsburgh Penguins (hockey). Seeing one of their games or matches is one of the more popular things to do in Pennsylvania.

Hershey Park is a great choice for families. The theme park offers more than 50 rides and attractions for kids of all ages, even the Hersey’s miniatures. Whether it’s the Comet Coaster, Old Tyme Photo Shop or boardwalk, there’s something everyone will enjoy. Aaron and Jessica’s Amish Buggy Rides is a local favorite in Lancaster. The tour takes you through covered bridges of the Dutch-German countryside and a visit through working, non-commercial farms.

For three days in July, watch ragged “soldiers” fight the bloody Battle of Gettysburg— celebrating its 150th anniversary in 2012—with cannons and bayonets. On your way out, grab a commemorative coffee mug or baseball cap at the Civil War store.

Snack on homemade shoofly pie while shopping for souvenirs such as scented candles and old-fashioned candies.

Insider Clout:Loupassakis arranges tours of World War II sites for clients staying at Le Manoir du Quesnay, in Normandy, owned by the family of a French Resistance leader. Years as agent: 48. Other specialty: Italy, Caribbean, Hawaii, France.

Housed inside the Reading Terminal Market, this gourmet food and souvenir shop specializes in locally made sweets, snacks, and crafts, all of which are available individually and in elaborate gift baskets.

Although a lounge by name, Liberté—inside the Hotel Sofitel—serves more than cocktails. The all-day menu has an eclectic variety of international dishes with a distinct French influence. The Center City restaurant's interiors include wingback chairs, red tones, and soft lighting.

For three days in July, you can watch ragged “soldiers” fight the bloody battle with cannons and bayonets for the 146th time. one-day general admission tickets from $24, kids ages 6–12 half-price

Brace Yourself: Opened in May 2008, the so-called “sweetest place on earth” just got edgier.

Created in 1955 to keep post-war businesses from relocating, Pittsburgh's Mellon Square not only accomplished that, but continues to attract city dwellers and tourists with live concerts and performances.

Penn State runs its own creamery, and it operates its own popular ice cream parlor with 18 flavors on rotation including cherry chip and peanut butter marshmallow.

Cutting-edge women’s boutique that helped jumpstart Old City’s fashion renaissance.

The Andy Warhol Museum honors local-boy-makes-good with more than 12,000 works of art covering seven stories.

Owned by Iron Chef Jose Garces, Village Whiskey is known for both its extensive whiskey, bourbon, and Scotch menu and its inventive American cuisine.

The walk-through, pulsing model of the human heart at this well-heeled science emporium is macabre enough to enchant children. Other exhibits include a replica space research station and a working steam locomotive.

Tad Carducci and Paul Tanguay designed the menu at APO (known to locals as Apothecary). Drinks in the “Elixirs” section have tongue-in-cheek names like Tippling Bros. Magical Pain Extractor (made with mint, rosemary, cayenne extract and Sicilian amaro).