Restaurants in Pennsylvania

Cavernous Greek

It would be hard to miss this Old City restaurant, with its colorful name-bearing banners running down the building. The relaxed 122-seater, which is co-owned by the Metropolitan Bakery team, is well loved for its contemporary American fare.

The restaurant serves candlelit period meals including dishes like peanut soup, and the specialty is Game Pie made of turkey, pheasant, and duck.

Situated in the Rittenhouse Square neighborhood, this no-frills pub is known for its immense selection of Belgian brews. The dim, narrow space contains two bars—one up front and one in back, separated by a handful of wooden booths.

With locations in two of Philadelphia's hippest neighborhoods, this popular brunch spot always has a line.

In an Old City neighborhood dominated by hoagie joints, this Market Street ice cream parlor is, by design, old school.

Tony Luke, Jr. founded his South Philly sandwich eatery in 1992 and put a gourmet twist on his hometown’s traditional cheese steak.

At the top of the Bellevue, commanding an aerial view of Philadelphia from the domed 19th floor, XIX Nineteen Café serves New American cuisine beneath a 19-foot chandelier with pearl strings and loops.

Located in the Fairmount neighborhood of the Art Museum District, this former 19th-century firehouse serves dressed-up, country-style food. Chef-owner Jack McDavid is known for old-fashioned dishes due to the success of his original Philadelphia eatery, the Down Home Diner.


Restaurateur Stephen Starr opened this pan-Asian restaurant, designing the interior with futuristic neon-lights and cylinder-shaped dining booths called pods that seat six to 12 and illuminate with bright colors that can be changed with an inside switch.

It wouldn’t be Philly without a cheese steak, so lay on the Cheese Wiz at this iconic restaurant. “Pat” is Pat Olivieri—the South Philly hot dog vendor who’s credited with inventing the Philly cheesesteak (with his brother Harry) back in 1920.