Pennsylvania

Restaurants in Pennsylvania

There’s nothing like encountering Pennsylvania Dutch cuisine. Pennsylvania Dutch cuisine is a reflection of the agrarian society, German heritage, and exclusion rapid change, and the restaurants in Pennsylvania reflect this cultural heritage.
The hot spot of Harrisburg is opportunely named The Fire House, located in the oldest standing firehouse in the city. Signature dishes include spicy chicken, crab and duck with lots of German-style beer choices. It’s by far one of the best restaurants in Pennsylvania. Of all of the choices throughout the state, one of the restaurants in Pennsylvania is the Olde Greenfield Inn in Lancaster. Secretly nuzzle at one of only two tables in the wine cellar of this 1780 farmhouse and choose from pastoral dishes like the lamb rack Dijonaise and pappardelle tossed with wild mushrooms, basil, and asparagus. At Continental in Philadelphia, customers sit in vintage vinyl booths under lamps fashioned like cocktail olives, or on the street-side patio. The bar has your classic drink options, and the menu’s got you covered with cuisines from around the world.

On a quiet side street, Sette Luna cultivates a short Italian menu. The wood-burning oven imparts warmth, but the crustless cheesecake is what dreams are made of.

This Philadelphia newcomer communicates comfort through traditional French-country dishes.

Tria opened this first location of its now citywide bar and café chain in Rittenhouse Square in 2004, based on the trinity of beer, wine, and cheese. The menu has a rotating selection of approximately 16 artisan cheeses at any time, ranging from Missouri sheep’s milk to Spanish goat cheese.

At his elegant hacienda-style restaurant, David Suro, who grew up near agave fields in the Mexican state of Jalisco, serves drinks by mixologist Junior Merino and around 100 tequilas.

Nuzzle in secret at one of only two tables in the wine cellar of this 1780 farmhouse, and choose from rustic dishes like the lamb rack Dijonaise and papardelle tossed with asparagus, wild mushrooms, and basil.

It would be hard to miss this Old City restaurant, with its colorful name-bearing banners running down the building. The relaxed 122-seater, which is co-owned by the Metropolitan Bakery team, is well loved for its contemporary American fare.

The old-school diner—clad in shiny steel punctuated by retro curved windows—has been baking its popular sticky buns (“grilled stickeys”) since 1929.

In an Old City neighborhood dominated by hoagie joints, this Market Street ice cream parlor is, by design, old school.

Tony Luke, Jr. founded his South Philly sandwich eatery in 1992 and put a gourmet twist on his hometown’s traditional cheese steak.

Water Works Restaurant & Lounge's riverfront view—which includes a cluster of buildings reminiscent of old Rome, Boat House Row, and the Schuylkill Dam—is the main attraction.

Considered one of the best Italian restaurants in the nation, this fine-dining landmark is usually booked two months in advance.

Parents will appreciate the hearty breakfast—kids will love the 20-plus kinds of pie.