Pennsylvania

Restaurants in Pennsylvania

North Bowl Lounge ‘n’ Lanes is housed in a former auto mechanic's garage, with exposed ductwork and brick walls, and polished concrete floors. Vintage 1950’s benches flank the 17 hardwood lanes, each outfitted with glow-in-the-dark pins. There are also billiards tables and arcade games.

Vintage and art bikes hang from bicycle-themed murals on the ceiling. Try a locally brewed Pedal Pale Ale with a hamburger—Pittsburghers call them Pitts-Burgers—topped with the city’s traditional fried egg and coleslaw.

Water Works Restaurant & Lounge's riverfront view—which includes a cluster of buildings reminiscent of old Rome, Boat House Row, and the Schuylkill Dam—is the main attraction.

In an Old City neighborhood dominated by hoagie joints, this Market Street ice cream parlor is, by design, old school.

Tony Luke, Jr. founded his South Philly sandwich eatery in 1992 and put a gourmet twist on his hometown’s traditional cheese steak.

Located in the Fairmount neighborhood of the Art Museum District, this former 19th-century firehouse serves dressed-up, country-style food. Chef-owner Jack McDavid is known for old-fashioned dishes due to the success of his original Philadelphia eatery, the Down Home Diner.

Pod

Restaurateur Stephen Starr opened this pan-Asian restaurant, designing the interior with futuristic neon-lights and cylinder-shaped dining booths called pods that seat six to 12 and illuminate with bright colors that can be changed with an inside switch.

The dishes, served in summer on a greenery-ensconced gazebo, include Thomas Jefferson’s own peanut soup recipe.

A member of Steven Starr's ever-expanding restaurant empire (which includes more than two dozen eateries on the East Coast), this Center City restaurant specializes in designer comfort food. Fried chicken and waffles, mac and cheese, and matzo ball soup all have a place on the menu.

Considered one of the best Italian restaurants in the nation, this fine-dining landmark is usually booked two months in advance.

Parents will appreciate the hearty breakfast—kids will love the 20-plus kinds of pie.

Chef Georges Perrier opened Le Bec-Fin in 1970, growing the restaurant to be one of the finest French dining rooms in the United States.