Pennsylvania

Restaurants in Pennsylvania

There’s nothing like encountering Pennsylvania Dutch cuisine. Pennsylvania Dutch cuisine is a reflection of the agrarian society, German heritage, and exclusion rapid change, and the restaurants in Pennsylvania reflect this cultural heritage.
The hot spot of Harrisburg is opportunely named The Fire House, located in the oldest standing firehouse in the city. Signature dishes include spicy chicken, crab and duck with lots of German-style beer choices. It’s by far one of the best restaurants in Pennsylvania. Of all of the choices throughout the state, one of the restaurants in Pennsylvania is the Olde Greenfield Inn in Lancaster. Secretly nuzzle at one of only two tables in the wine cellar of this 1780 farmhouse and choose from pastoral dishes like the lamb rack Dijonaise and pappardelle tossed with wild mushrooms, basil, and asparagus. At Continental in Philadelphia, customers sit in vintage vinyl booths under lamps fashioned like cocktail olives, or on the street-side patio. The bar has your classic drink options, and the menu’s got you covered with cuisines from around the world.

Knoebels is also notable for some of the most inventive theme-park food in America, including peanut butter and jelly milkshakes and deep-fried brownies.

Xochitl (pronounced “so-cheet”), a tequila bar/restaurant at the foot of Pine Street in Society Hill, serves Pre-Hispanic Mexican dishes like red snapper ceviche, braised beef short rib, and a mushroom tamale.

The Fountain at the Four Seasons faces the single-burst Love Park fountain and Robert Indiana's famous Love sculpture. The restaurant serves French-influenced American cuisine in a lavish 107-seat dining room featuring dark woods and crystal chandeliers.

At the top of the Bellevue, commanding an aerial view of Philadelphia from the domed 19th floor, XIX Nineteen Café serves New American cuisine beneath a 19-foot chandelier with pearl strings and loops.

It wouldn’t be Philly without a cheese steak, so lay on the Cheese Wiz at this iconic restaurant. “Pat” is Pat Olivieri—the South Philly hot dog vendor who’s credited with inventing the Philly cheesesteak (with his brother Harry) back in 1920.

Known all over the world, Geno's has been a pioneer of that greasy tradition, the Philly cheesesteak, since 1966.

Lobster ravioli and filet mignon may be off-message, but are followed by chocolaty desserts.

On Walnut Street in Rittenhouse Square, the Hollywood of old appears anew in Butcher and Singer's blending elegant gilt, marble, and golden chandeliers with quirky touches like a dressed-up dogs mural.

Although he worked in several acclaimed local kitchens, it wasn’t until Israeli-born chef Michael Solomonov did it his way at Zahav that he achieved national regard, winning the 2011 James Beard Award for Best Chef in the Mid-Atlantic.