Pennsylvania

Restaurants in Pennsylvania

There’s nothing like encountering Pennsylvania Dutch cuisine. Pennsylvania Dutch cuisine is a reflection of the agrarian society, German heritage, and exclusion rapid change, and the restaurants in Pennsylvania reflect this cultural heritage.
The hot spot of Harrisburg is opportunely named The Fire House, located in the oldest standing firehouse in the city. Signature dishes include spicy chicken, crab and duck with lots of German-style beer choices. It’s by far one of the best restaurants in Pennsylvania. Of all of the choices throughout the state, one of the restaurants in Pennsylvania is the Olde Greenfield Inn in Lancaster. Secretly nuzzle at one of only two tables in the wine cellar of this 1780 farmhouse and choose from pastoral dishes like the lamb rack Dijonaise and pappardelle tossed with wild mushrooms, basil, and asparagus. At Continental in Philadelphia, customers sit in vintage vinyl booths under lamps fashioned like cocktail olives, or on the street-side patio. The bar has your classic drink options, and the menu’s got you covered with cuisines from around the world.

Knoebels is also notable for some of the most inventive theme-park food in America, including peanut butter and jelly milkshakes and deep-fried brownies.

Known all over the world, Geno's has been a pioneer of that greasy tradition, the Philly cheesesteak, since 1966.

Although he worked in several acclaimed local kitchens, it wasn’t until Israeli-born chef Michael Solomonov did it his way at Zahav that he achieved national regard, winning the 2011 James Beard Award for Best Chef in the Mid-Atlantic.

The Lai family fled both Vietnam and a Malaysian refugee camp before opening this once tiny Vietnamese restaurant in 1984. Benny Lai, the son of the original owners, took over in 1989 and renovated the space into a three-story building with a lounge.

This British-style pub in the Art Museum District offers indoor and (in season) outdoor seating.

This colorful space serves delicious house-made guacamole and has a wall lined with hundreds of tiny Day of the Dead figurines.

Located in Old City, this New American restaurant specializes in fresh seasonal cuisine, much of it sourced from local farms near Philadelphia. Hand-painted chandelier coverings and patterned, floor-to-ceiling velvet curtains are offset by an open kitchen and cast-concrete bar.

On a quiet side street, Sette Luna cultivates a short Italian menu. The wood-burning oven imparts warmth, but the crustless cheesecake is what dreams are made of.

This Philadelphia newcomer communicates comfort through traditional French-country dishes.

Tria opened this first location of its now citywide bar and café chain in Rittenhouse Square in 2004, based on the trinity of beer, wine, and cheese. The menu has a rotating selection of approximately 16 artisan cheeses at any time, ranging from Missouri sheep’s milk to Spanish goat cheese.

At his elegant hacienda-style restaurant, David Suro, who grew up near agave fields in the Mexican state of Jalisco, serves drinks by mixologist Junior Merino and around 100 tequilas.

Nuzzle in secret at one of only two tables in the wine cellar of this 1780 farmhouse, and choose from rustic dishes like the lamb rack Dijonaise and papardelle tossed with asparagus, wild mushrooms, and basil.