Pennsylvania

Restaurants in Pennsylvania

There’s nothing like encountering Pennsylvania Dutch cuisine. Pennsylvania Dutch cuisine is a reflection of the agrarian society, German heritage, and exclusion rapid change, and the restaurants in Pennsylvania reflect this cultural heritage.
The hot spot of Harrisburg is opportunely named The Fire House, located in the oldest standing firehouse in the city. Signature dishes include spicy chicken, crab and duck with lots of German-style beer choices. It’s by far one of the best restaurants in Pennsylvania. Of all of the choices throughout the state, one of the restaurants in Pennsylvania is the Olde Greenfield Inn in Lancaster. Secretly nuzzle at one of only two tables in the wine cellar of this 1780 farmhouse and choose from pastoral dishes like the lamb rack Dijonaise and pappardelle tossed with wild mushrooms, basil, and asparagus. At Continental in Philadelphia, customers sit in vintage vinyl booths under lamps fashioned like cocktail olives, or on the street-side patio. The bar has your classic drink options, and the menu’s got you covered with cuisines from around the world.

Knoebels is also notable for some of the most inventive theme-park food in America, including peanut butter and jelly milkshakes and deep-fried brownies.

This Center City restaurant serves contemporary Mexican cuisine and invites customers to BYOT — where the "T" stands for tequila. The space consists of exposed brick walls, an open kitchen, black-framed mirrors, and dark wooden furniture.

West Philadelphia's Distrito serves modern Mexican cuisine in a 250-seat restaurant decorated with kitschy details like vivid pink lighting and a wall of Mexican wrestling masks.

In 1997, Louis Sarcone, Jr. and Anthony Bucci took their great grandfather’s bakery rolls and created a menu of 40 different hoagies. Then they opened Sarcone’s Deli, an Italian sandwich shop, neighboring the fifth-generation Sarcone family bakery just 50 feet away.

This Rittenhouse gastropub is popular with the after-work and date-night crowds. The dining room has exposed brick walls and banquette seating.

Vintage and art bikes hang from bicycle-themed murals on the ceiling. Try a locally brewed Pedal Pale Ale with a hamburger—Pittsburghers call them Pitts-Burgers—topped with the city’s traditional fried egg and coleslaw.

A member of Steven Starr's ever-expanding restaurant empire (which includes more than two dozen eateries on the East Coast), this Center City restaurant specializes in designer comfort food. Fried chicken and waffles, mac and cheese, and matzo ball soup all have a place on the menu.

Cavernous Greek

Chef Jose Garces' second Philadelphia restaurant, Tinto, takes its cues from the tapas and wine bars in the Basque region of Spain. The dining room is designed like a wine cellar; the walls are lined with wooden grids containing thousands of bottles from Northern Spain and Southwestern France.