Restaurants in Pennsylvania


The strangest sandwiches in town are found at this hip diner. The “Doh! Nut” burger is topped with chocolate-covered bacon and served on a glazed donut. Every week a new burger—wilder than the last—is born.

Reminiscent of a Texas barbecue joint, this Stephen Starr restaurant serves smoked meats by the pound on trays with brown paper. Enjoy brisket, pulled pork, and ribs at al fresco picnic tables. The drink menu features over 100 North American whiskeys and bourbons.

One of Philadelphia’s most unique eateries, Abe Fisher serves foods of the Jewish diaspora. Traditional ingredients are deliciously transformed: Smoked beef tongue works as crispy lardons in matzo brei, and pumpernickel becomes warm bread-pudding croutons in a summer squash caesar salad.

The most casual eatery in hometown hero Marc Vetri’s growing empire of popular Italian restaurants.

Serving authentic Abruzzese meals in South Philadelphia, Le Virtu cooks up Italian food that stands out in a city filled with it.

Knoebels is also notable for some of the most inventive theme-park food in America, including peanut butter and jelly milkshakes and deep-fried brownies.

This colorful space serves delicious house-made guacamole and has a wall lined with hundreds of tiny Day of the Dead figurines.

Southwark’s owners source their ingredients from local farmers, co-ops, and often even from their own gardens, supporting the sustainable Slow Food movement. Small plates include artisan cheeses and house-made sausage, while locally caught quail and trout can be found on the entrée menu.

At this restored 1960's stainless-steel-clad diner in the Old City, patrons sit in vintage vinyl booths under lamps fashioned like cocktail olives, or on the street-side patio.

Energetic New American

Chef-owner Susanna Foo, who closed her high-profile, namesake fine-dining restaurant in Center City after a 22-year-run, serves her no-boundaries Chinese food at this upscale-casual spot on the Main Line.

Enjoy a classic clam shack experience (the clam cakes or whole bellies are the way to go)

On a quiet side street, Sette Luna cultivates a short Italian menu. The wood-burning oven imparts warmth, but the crustless cheesecake is what dreams are made of.