Pennsylvania

Restaurants in Pennsylvania

Knoebels is also notable for some of the most inventive theme-park food in America, including peanut butter and jelly milkshakes and deep-fried brownies.

This Center City restaurant serves contemporary Mexican cuisine and invites customers to BYOT — where the "T" stands for tequila. The space consists of exposed brick walls, an open kitchen, black-framed mirrors, and dark wooden furniture.

Nuzzle in secret at one of only two tables in the wine cellar of this 1780 farmhouse, and choose from rustic dishes like the lamb rack Dijonaise and papardelle tossed with asparagus, wild mushrooms, and basil.

Family-style Thai-Japanese

From Philadelphia restaurateur Stephen Starr, Alma de Cuba has a minimalist style with glass walls, clean-lined furniture, and portraits of Cubans on the walls. The crowd that gathers here, just a block east of Rittenhouse Square, tends to be casually dressed and happy to sip on mojitos.

West Philadelphia's Distrito serves modern Mexican cuisine in a 250-seat restaurant decorated with kitschy details like vivid pink lighting and a wall of Mexican wrestling masks.

In 1997, Louis Sarcone, Jr. and Anthony Bucci took their great grandfather’s bakery rolls and created a menu of 40 different hoagies. Then they opened Sarcone’s Deli, an Italian sandwich shop, neighboring the fifth-generation Sarcone family bakery just 50 feet away.

This Rittenhouse gastropub is popular with the after-work and date-night crowds. The dining room has exposed brick walls and banquette seating.

It would be hard to miss this Old City restaurant, with its colorful name-bearing banners running down the building. The relaxed 122-seater, which is co-owned by the Metropolitan Bakery team, is well loved for its contemporary American fare.

The old-school diner—clad in shiny steel punctuated by retro curved windows—has been baking its popular sticky buns (“grilled stickeys”) since 1929.

Situated in the Rittenhouse Square neighborhood, this no-frills pub is known for its immense selection of Belgian brews. The dim, narrow space contains two bars—one up front and one in back, separated by a handful of wooden booths.