Pennsylvania

Hotels in Pennsylvania

The 1815 property was once used as a Confederate hospital, but has since been updated with 18 guest rooms and a restaurant. Plank floors, country quilts, and wood-burning fireplaces send you into a cozy time warp.

The Majestic Chambre has inlaid-wood furniture and a double whirlpool bath, which can be drawn for you and floated with rose petals while you’re at dinner. All rooms are equipped with fireplaces, and, on a practical note, come with free WiFi.

A dramatic dark-shingled manor house set among colorful gardens of begonias, zinnias, and vinca, 125-foot-tall spruces, and one of the largest walnut trees in the area, the Gatehouse Country Inn preserves its 100-year-old past in four guest rooms, each decorated with period furnishings and delica

Family-friendly and convenient to Hersheypark amusement park, this 665-room resort is a good bet in the summer, when its three swimming pools are especially welcome; family bingo is played for—what else?—chocolate prizes.

The resort’s log cabins are near the park’s Crystal Pool swim area (opened 1926) and the Twister, a re-creation of a lost wooden gem from Denver.

A four-story brick building on a quiet, cobblestone street, the 364-room Sheraton Society Hill is located in one of Philadelphia's most historic areas. The subway is a five-minute walk away, and attractions such as the Liberty Bell and the Customs House, about 10-minutes away.

Escape from urban life at this lakeside retreat on 150 wooded acres two hours northwest of New York City, where hatha yoga sessions are followed by rounds of golf and wine tastings.

Housed in an 1856 English country mansion, the Hamanassett B&B is owned and operated by Civil War reenactors.

Set in tony Society Hill (a 10-minute taxi ride away), the hotel features period furniture in a circa-1769 row house across from Independence Hall.

Wake up to a vista of cornfields and gardens after a night at this family owned, five-bedroom inn on a 200-year-old farm.

Bradford was a boomtown in the state’s oil rush of the late 1800’s, and Clayton Glenville Dorn made a fortune extracting oil from long-abandoned fields (using a controversial method similar to fracking). Glendorn was the “oasis in the woods” created for his family in 1929.

Visiting devotees of the American architectural master, Frank Lloyd Wright, can spend the night in the 1957 Duncan House at Polymath Park, a 125-acre nature reserve in the Laurel Highlands just 17 miles south of the Wright-designed Fallingwater.