Paris

Things to do in Paris

Since launching in 2000, this cutting-edge boutique in Le Marais has expanded with a multidisciplinary studio and film division that covers everything from music videos to TV commercials.

Opened in 1906, Van Cleef & Arpels’ first boutique still occupies the same spot in the elegant Place Vendome. Designed by Patrick Jouin, the luxurious shop features a palate of creams and beiges, gently curving display cases, silk-covered furniture, and sparkling chandeliers.

At only 289 acres, the largely residential Third Arrondissement is the second smallest district in Paris. The neighborhood contains the northern section of Le Marais (the Marsh) district, established in 1240, as well as the city’s burgeoning Chinatown.

Paris is known for fashion but Iglaine near Rue Etienne Marcel covers the whole gamut—from modern to early 20th century and from Europe, America, and Asia.

A family-run business for nearly 100 years, Fouquet sells various candies from this antique-store-turned-confiserie (candy store).

Original Debut: When the king of theaters broke ground in 1931, with a whopping 3,300 seats and a John Eberson–designed interior, patrons were dazzled by its potted palm trees, faux Venetian monuments, and a ceiling that shimmered with tiny starlike lights.

Founded by Patrick Melloul, Biondini sells a collection of super pricy, and unique, shoes. The largest designer shoe retailer in the city, the company offers cutting-edge designs in men's and women's shoes at three revamped and minimalist boutiques on the Champs Elysee.

Roger Vivier (the man who invited stilettos) was a legendary French shoe designer with a fashion house that still bears his name. Vivier’s flagship boutique on the 1ère arrondissement’s Rue Faubourg St.-Honoré has a simple exterior with glass doors and a large silver buckle door handle.