Paris

Restaurants in Paris

One of the city’s most celebrated restaurants, Spring is owned and operated by Chicago-born, French-trained chef Daniel Rose. In 2010, the already-renowned restaurant reopened in a 17th-century building in the First Arrondissement, just one block from the Louvre.

This authentic French bistro dating to 1912 has played host to every Parisian mayor of the past century. Just steps from the city's Hotel de Ville (town hall), Benoit was run by a single family for three generations before being obtained by Alain Ducasse's restaurant group in 2005.

Tapas-style dining is the mark of Le Salon d'Hélène, as is the southwest France cuisine created by the salon’s Basque chef-owner Hélène Darroze, who comes from a family of hotel and restaurant owners.

At the original Angelina location near the Louvre, patrons sit elbow-to-elbow in the Belle Époque dining room, with its sweeping archways, chandeliers, gold accents, and dramatic lighting.

Considered the epicenter of the bistronomy movement, La Régalade opened in 1992 under the direction of Yves Camdeborde, champion of the French back-to-basics culinary revolution. Chef Bruno Doucet now carries on the tradition.

A popular way to view the City of Lights is at night aboard the Don Juan II, a 1931 yacht where intimate gatherings of no more than 40 dine in leather seats among antique paintings and soft lighting.

Pricy even by Paris standards, Alain Ducasse's flagship restaurant at the ritzy Hotel Plaza Athenee marries haute cuisine with designer decor. Pierre Tachon table art adorns a swanky dining space backed by a series of exquisitely embroidered screens.

Housed in a historic 1890 building and immediately recognizable by its red facade, Aux Lyonnais is an inviting Parisian eatery dedicated to preserving the culinary traditions of Lyon.

Tout Paris has been flocking of late to experience the zingy, citrus-inflected cuisine of this 2010-opened restaurant.

Just down from the Louvre on a Saint Honoré side-street, Le Garde Robe is an intimate wine bar and shop.

In a freak flood in 1910, the Seine reached the second floor of 4 Rue de Bercy. Three years later a café opened. In response to the flood, the buildings on either side were jacked up a couple of meters, but not No. 4. Nobody knows why.

With décor inspired by the Villa Farnesina in Rome, Farnesina restaurant serves gourmet Italian cuisine to the likes of Isabelle Adjani and Inès de la Fressange.

Situated in the trendy 11th Arrondissement, Bistrot Paul Bert is a classic French eatery with unexpected twists. Inspired by local flea market finds, the eclectic interior includes a bright mosaic floor, oversize mirrors, small wooden tables, and unusual chandeliers.

Japanese chef Shinichi Sato’s Asian-inspired contemporary French cuisine has been persistently difficult to taste since being awarded a second Michelin star in April 2011.