Paris

Restaurants in Paris

Situated within the tourist-site triumvirate of the Tuilieries, the Louvre, and the Palais Royal, Cibus offers upscale Italian dining in an atmosphere so warm and homey you'll find it hard to believe you're dining out. The interior space is tiny, seating no more than 16.

A go-to bistro for the trendy locals of Marais, Café Charlot is housed in a former bakery across from the Marche des Enfants Rouge—literally the “Market of Red Children,” the oldest food market in Paris.

At Les Ombres is known for its close-up views of the Eiffel Tower, whose metal architecture the restaurant seems to mimic with its geometric, glass ceiling. Indeed, “Les Ombres” means “the shadows,” referring to those cast by the neighboring tower.

Located right by Cimetiere du Montparnasse in the 14th arrondissement, Le Duc restaurant has been frequented by the likes of Diane von Furstenberg and the late President Mitterrand, who come to sample the fresh seafood.

The food of France’s Breton region shines at Chez Michel.

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One lofty dining room, decorated with bright and bold contemporary paintings on every available wall, serves as the annex to chef William Ledeuil’s wildly popular Ze Kitchen Galerie in St. Germain.

21 is one of those under-the-radar Paris restaurants where true gourmands love to dine, regardless of the steep prices.

Located in the Les Halles area, known as the belly of Paris, the establishment was built in 1880, based on the glass and iron buildings built by Victor Baltard.

Located inside Paris’s esteemed Hôtel Hospes Lancaster, La Table du Lancaster serves as a creative vehicle for chef Michel Troisgros, recipient of a Michelin star.

Located in the fifth arrondissement, known as the Latin Quarter, this wood-beamed bistro boasts a steel counter-topped bar and a wine cellar with 120 varietals.

Everything about this sleek room in shades of café au lait suggests a serious restaurant, but the set-meal prices say bistro.

Paris's temples of fine dining at reasonable prices are its brasseries, a cross between a café and a restaurant where simple dishes start around $20.

This authentic French bistro dating to 1912 has played host to every Parisian mayor of the past century. Just steps from the city's Hotel de Ville (town hall), Benoit was run by a single family for three generations before being obtained by Alain Ducasse's restaurant group in 2005.

Tapas-style dining is the mark of Le Salon d'Hélène, as is the southwest France cuisine created by the salon’s Basque chef-owner Hélène Darroze, who comes from a family of hotel and restaurant owners.

At the original Angelina location near the Louvre, patrons sit elbow-to-elbow in the Belle Époque dining room, with its sweeping archways, chandeliers, gold accents, and dramatic lighting.