Paris

Restaurants in Paris

Forget convention: at this brainchild of a World’s Best Sommelier, you first pick your wine and then the chef composes something to fit your selection (taking your allergy to shellfish or aversion to mushrooms into consideration).

Located in Hotel Le Méridien in the outskirts of the city near the convention center, L’Orénoc boasts a contemporary dining room complete with hardwood floors, faux leather seats, and a life-size jaguar statue.

More affordable than the cutting-edge chef's flagship restaurant, Pierre Gagnaire's Gaya Rive Gauche is a fish house in Saint-Germain with a minimalist style typical of high-end 21st-century eateries.

Housed inside Lavinia, one of Europe’s largest wine stores, Le Restaurant Lavinia is the ideal place to sample from the store’s collection of more than 6,000 bottles of wine from countries around the world, including Argentina, Italy, and the U.S.

It is only fitting that Chef Cyril Lignac's swanky bistro in the city's lively Popincourt neighborhood would be housed in a registered historical monument, as quintessential French cuisine and vintage decor go hand in hand. Established by the Chardenoux family in the early 20th century, the names

The new French foodie revolution is the organic wine movement, and restaurant owner Gilles Bénard is one of its great champions.

Situated in the Seventh Arrondissement, this small, lively bistro is often lauded as the best in Paris. Run by celebrated chef Stéphane Jego, the restaurant serves authentic Basque fare in a traditional bistro-style setting with closely packed tables and an open kitchen.

Gilles Choukroun, the mediagenic chef of the new restaurant is the founder and former president of Générations.C—yet another French food movement for change—the boyishly handsome Choukroun is doing his part at the cool gray-and-fuchsia-accented MBC.

Located in a less-traveled section of Montmarte, this tiny café and bar caters to an almost exclusively local clientele.

A favorite of President Nicolas Sarkozy, this small crêperie is situated on a quiet square in the 15th Arrondissement.

Follow the advice of Julia Child and visit iconic patisserie Rollet Pradier. The stone building, with its large front windows filled with enticements, has been a part of the Seventh Arrondissement since 1859.

Known for its large portions and friendly atmosphere, Josephine Chez Dumonet greets guests with joking waiters that speak a little English, and kitchen staff that will gladly stand for a picture.

The "heep-ster" atmosphere at lunch is abso-lutely intolerable (unless you happen to be one, in which case turn on your laptop and start smoking your brains out), but the freestanding, monumental horseshoe of a zinc at Le Pure Café has got to be seen.

More affordable than the cutting-edge chef's flagship restaurant, Pierre Gagnaire's Gaya Rive Gauche is a fish house in Saint-Germain renovated in the minimalist style typical of high-end 21st-century eateries.

Just around the corner from Palais Royal and the Louvre, Maceo has been a popular spot for over 30 years for prominent guests such as President Eisenhower. Eighteenth-century walls frame the elegant yet casual restaurant enhanced by large mirrors and deep leather armchairs.