Paris

Restaurants in Paris

Despite chef-owner Christian Constant’s rise to fame on the local culinary scene, his namesake restaurant remains rooted in the humble neighborhood café tradition.

Chef William Ledeuil, who earned his toque under Guy Savoy, is a scholar of Asian flavors, grafting them with impeccably French, impeccably modern techniques, as seen through the open kitchen of this handsome, Michelin star-winning St. Germain restaurant.

Yen

Located just a few steps from St.-Germain-des-Prés’ iconic Café de Flore, Yen is an authentic Japanese cuisine restaurant and noodle house. The simple lines, wood doors, and lone white flag outside complement Yen’s minimalist Asian décor inside.

A modern interior with blond wood and translucent plastic chairs sets the stage for trendy Parisians and tourists who might want a switch from traditional French fare. The family-owned and operated Little Italy Trattoria serves generous portions of fresh pasta and salads in Le Marais.

Since 1946, Au Pied de Cochon has been treating guests to thoughtful French cuisine with a focus on the almighty pig. Decorated in Art Nouveau style, the restaurant boasts elaborate walls adorned with mirrors and paintings of ladies, red leather banquettes, wood accented ceilings, and twinkling c

Citrus Etoile is owned and operated by the celebrated Chef Gilles Epie who, in addition to being acclaimed from Japan to Los Angeles, was the youngest chef to ever win a Michelin star at age 22.

The concise wine list here is a paean to France’s vin naturel gurus, such as the Jura region’s anti-sulfur crusader Pierre Overnoy and Beaujolais renegade Philippe Jambon.

Tough to beat for ambiance, this hip and lively Spanish restaurant on the banks of the Seine brings a bit of old Madrid to the city of lights.

Epicure in Paris’s Hôtel Le Bristol evolves as the seasons change.

The Scene: Seattle transplants Braden (a chef) and Laura (a baker) worried about making friends after their move to Paris last year. Their ingenious answer: throw dinner parties, and lots of them.

Whether seated in the sunlight by the front windows, at the center room's bar, or beneath the back section's glass ceiling, diners find the red and gray decor and neo-bistro dishes reflected in Le Miroir's numerous framed mirrors (hence the name).

Here, striped Basque runners on tables and a wine list scrawled on distressed mirrors set the mood for chef Julien Duboué’s playful exuberance: a cheeky boudin noir “napoleon” richly layered with apples; a whole magret (duck breast) baked on a bed of grape leaves atop a clay roof shingle.

The Place du Trocadéro, strategic for its view of the Eiffel Tower, has a multitude of café terraces from which to admire it, but only one is an institution.

This Alsatian brasserie in the 17th arrondissement has been around since 1925 and continues to specialize in seafood, particularly shellfish.