Paris

Restaurants in Paris

The fresh greenmarket flavors at this crowd-pleaser are inspired in part by chef Grégory Marchand’s stint at New York’s Gramercy Tavern.

Live out the ultimate farm-to-table fantasy with a meal at chef Alain Passard's Michelin three-starred restaurant.

This tiny, traditional, 20-seat bistro-style restaurant in the Sixth Arrondisment, just outside the Hotel les Jardins du Luxembourg, is not just old school, it’s old world.

Owned by Caroline Rostang, the daughter of French culinary giant Michel Rostang, L’Absinthe is best described as a New York-inspired French bistro. The restaurant nods to New York City with its urban chic design, highlighted by the oversized, antique clock on the ground floor.

Located in the fifth arrondissement not far from Pierre and Marie Curie University, this small wine bar has only three pine tables and several wine barrels that have been converted into dining tables.

Children can lunch on saucisse et frites (basically a hot dog without a bun and French fries) and ice cream at this outdoor café in the Luxembourg Gardens (enter on the Rue Guynemer side of the garden).

Whether you're stopping in to buy foie gras from the grocery or settling in for a leisurely brunch or lunch overlooking the idyllic Canal Saint Martin, La Cantine de Quentin is a worthy destination.

Head to the base of Montmartre for a taste of Parisian nightlife. Michou, the legendary man behind this retro-styled drag show, has hosted audiences for more than 50 years. As expected, décor is campy (think dim red lighting, mirror covered walls, and glitter).

Situated in the Musée des Arts Décoratifs (Museum of Decorative Arts), this two-story restaurant serves simple French fare in a stylish setting.

Situated on Rue Saint Maur in Paris, this African restaurant celebrates the cuisine of Cameroon and Senegal. The menu features a number of dishes made with traditional African ingredients such as maffe (peanut) and bitterleaf.

Chef Yves Camdeborde’s Le Comptoir on the Left Bank seats only 20, so reservations for the single-seating prix fixe dinner must usually be made several months in advance. Fortunately, the restaurant also operates as a more casual brasserie during lunchtime.

This wine store-cum-restaurant is a new idiom on the Parisian dining scene, and a welcome one.

Near the Place du Trocadéro in the district of the Bastille, Cavestève specializes in small-scale producers and vintage champagnes.

Formerly the restaurant of the Hôtel d'Orsay, this Belle Èpoque dining room is much the same as it was when it first opened in 1900. Located on the first floor of the museum, the restaurant is adorned with crystal chandeliers, a frescoed ceiling, and tall arched windows overlooking the Seine.

A fun spot to watch the natives drink and scarf down oysters, this neighborhood restaurant and bar in southern Monmartre has local color to spare. Opened the same year the Moulin Rouge and Eiffel Tower debuted (1889), La Mascotte features Art Deco decor and authentic Parisian cuisine.