Restaurants in Paris

Chez Savy hasn't changed much, if at all, since its inception in 1923. Located near the famed Champs-Elysées in the Eighth Arrondissement, this quintessential French bistro serves original cuisine from Auvergne among traditional Art Deco touches of Jazz Age Paris.

Fauchon is easily recognizable from its hot pink and black store front. The flagship store on Place de la Madeleine houses a patisserie and boulangerie that sell sandwiches, breads, and desserts; rows of pastries line the gold walls.

Named for the small round iron and enamel pots in which dishes are both cooked and presented, the tiny Les Cocottes specializes in seasonal fare like crab and sucrine lettuce or shoulder of lamb confit with potatoes.

Formerly a simple working-class restaurant, Astier is newly elevated thanks to new ownership and a chef who earned his stripes at Le Meurice.

Known for his more highbrow eateries La Tour d'Argent and Hotel de Crillon, Chef Dominique Bouchet embraces simpler and less pricey fare in his self-named bistro located in one of Paris' most beautiful neighborhoods.

Le Cinq, located on the lobby level of Paris’s Four Seasons George V Hotel, offers a seasonal menu of French cuisine prepared using traditional French methods with an element of modernity in the execution.

The Scene: Seattle transplants Braden (a chef) and Laura (a baker) worried about making friends after their move to Paris last year. Their ingenious answer: throw dinner parties, and lots of them.

Whether seated in the sunlight by the front windows, at the center room's bar, or beneath the back section's glass ceiling, diners find the red and gray decor and neo-bistro dishes reflected in Le Miroir's numerous framed mirrors (hence the name).

This Asian teahouse in the Second Arrondissement is known for its bubble tea, a Taiwanese green or black tea with gummy pearls of tapioca. (Bubble tea is typically sipped from a fat straw so as to make room for the pearls at the bottom of the cup).

When Jacques Mélac’s father opened Le Palais du Bon Vin here in 1938, it was a clamorous quarter of typesetters, printers, and smithies. Before and after work and during breaks they fueled up on vin de pays and handed their empties over the zinc to be filled for home consumption.

This tearoom occupies the former dining room (and terrace) of the splendid 19th-century Jacquemart-André Museum.

A burgundy front with white trim and a round metal sign bearing the name "L'Ourcine" marks this gourmet bistro on Rue Broca in the Thirteenth Arrondissement. White walls and white napkins with accent stripes contrast with the wood tables and chairs.

Presidents from across the globe, including Jacques Chirac, Bill Clinton, and Vladimir Putin, once dined at this traditional bistro in the Seventh Arrondissement, just a five-minute walk from Les Invalides.

Located in a former jazz club, La Société is part of the Costes brothers' empire, a portfolio of upper-echelon Parisian restaurants.

Installed between Les Halles and Jardin du Palais Royal, La Cloche des Halles sits under a red awning on rue Coquillière. Tables line the sidewalk, while cozy banquettes and tiny wooden tables fill the interior space.