Restaurants in Paris

This unassuming bakery on the cusp of the Luxembourg Gardens offers a range of pastries, breads, and lunch dishes. Its corner placement, with hanging flowers above the adjoining sidewalk, offers a chance to people-watch from either outside or through the large windows.

Clued-in locals and famous food critics swear by this tatty Auvergnate bistro de quartier right off the Place Vendôme.

Located right by Cimetiere du Montparnasse in the 14th arrondissement, Le Duc restaurant has been frequented by the likes of Diane von Furstenberg and the late President Mitterrand, who come to sample the fresh seafood.

The food of France’s Breton region shines at Chez Michel.

Gilles Choukroun, the mediagenic chef of the new restaurant is the founder and former president of Générations.C—yet another French food movement for change—the boyishly handsome Choukroun is doing his part at the cool gray-and-fuchsia-accented MBC.

This eco-friendly, two-floor eatery serves an all-organic menuconsider risotto topped with shaved truffles or a terrine of diver scallopsin a design-forward space replete with neon lights and slashes of vivid red and green.

Set in a mid-18th-century garden and a Napoleon III-style hunting lodge in the Bois de Boulogne, Le Pré Catelan strikes a balance between its historic setting and the innovative cuisine of renowned chef Frédéric Anton.

Not far from the Jardin du Luxembourg, chef Guy Martin established Sensing, and then left it to young chef Fabrizio La Mantia. Sensing was named one of Gayot’s 2011 Hot 10 Paris Restaurants. Royal-purple banquettes and chairs surround natural wood tables.

Located inside Paris’s esteemed Hôtel Hospes Lancaster, La Table du Lancaster serves as a creative vehicle for chef Michel Troisgros, recipient of a Michelin star.

The Chef: Former musician/pizza maker Guy Martin was credited with resurrecting Le Grand Véfour—one of Paris’s oldest and most storied restaurants—in 2000, when it was the only restaurant to earn three stars from the annual Red Michelin Guide.

Parisian foodies are mad for the $47 blackboard menu at Itinéraires. After the smashing success of their original restaurant in the 11th, Sylvain and Sarah Sendra recently upgraded to these grown-up premises in the Latin Quarter.

Given that it sits in prime tourist territory, this small neighborhood bistro is all too easy to miss—or dismiss—but its loyal (and largely French) clientele knows better.

Situated in the Musée des Arts Décoratifs (Museum of Decorative Arts), this two-story restaurant serves simple French fare in a stylish setting.

Located in the Les Halles area, known as the belly of Paris, the establishment was built in 1880, based on the glass and iron buildings built by Victor Baltard.

A bit off the beaten tourist track in the Batignolles area of the Seventeenth Arrondissement, Le Bistral is a rustic chic “gastro-restro” with a twist: The chefwho serves up inventive versions of French classicsis Japanese.