Paris

Restaurants in Paris

Located in the fifth arrondissement, known as the Latin Quarter, this wood-beamed bistro boasts a steel counter-topped bar and a wine cellar with 120 varietals.

Everything about this sleek room in shades of café au lait suggests a serious restaurant, but the set-meal prices say bistro.

Paris's temples of fine dining at reasonable prices are its brasseries, a cross between a café and a restaurant where simple dishes start around $20.

With a central location on Rue Cler, a popular, pedestrian-only market street, Café du Marché is a draw to locals and tourists alike.

L’Entredgeu is place few American visitors have know about, but the Parisian bistro is frequented and adored by locals. The name comes from noted chef-owner, Phillipe Tredgeu, who manages the cooking, and his wife, who expertly runs the front of the house.

Housed in the Bini family home on Rue Gérgoire de Tours, Casa Bini looks like a rustic taverna, with its terra cotta tiles, exposed beams, bright yellows and greens, and two olive trees.

With décor inspired by the Villa Farnesina in Rome, Farnesina restaurant serves gourmet Italian cuisine to the likes of Isabelle Adjani and Inès de la Fressange.

Situated in the trendy 11th Arrondissement, Bistrot Paul Bert is a classic French eatery with unexpected twists. Inspired by local flea market finds, the eclectic interior includes a bright mosaic floor, oversize mirrors, small wooden tables, and unusual chandeliers.

Japanese chef Shinichi Sato’s Asian-inspired contemporary French cuisine has been persistently difficult to taste since being awarded a second Michelin star in April 2011.

Upon entering the main dining room of Les Élysées, in the four-star Hotel Vernet near the Champs Élysées and Arc de Triomphe, look up to see the stained-glass dome ceiling with gilded edging, designed by Gustave Eiffel.

Across from Norte Dame on the Left Bank, this bistro serves a combination of classic and modern French cuisine imagined by world-renowned chef Guy Savoy.

Founded as an organic wine shop that later added a supper club for friends, Le Chapeau Melon ("the bowler hat") in Belleville is now a restaurant that stays true to its oenophile roots and to the refined palate of chef and sommelier Oliver Camus.

Located on the Left Bank near le Bon Marché department store, this busy wine bar was first established in the 1950's. The intimate, glass-enclosed space is furnished with an original zinc bar as well as ceramic tiles and vineyard-themed frescoes created by local artists.

Owned by brothers Gilbert and Jean-Louis Costes of the renowned Hôtel Costes, Le Georges opened in 2000 on the top floor of the Centre Georges Pompidou, home of the Musée National d'Art Moderne (National Museum of Modern Art).

Philippe Starck’s redo of this Paris institution, including its Michelin three-starred restaurant, features some surreal touches, from table legs shod in fancy footwear to a frosted mirror (it’s literally refrigerator-cooled).