Paris

Restaurants in Paris

Follow the advice of Julia Child and visit iconic patisserie Rollet Pradier. The stone building, with its large front windows filled with enticements, has been a part of the Seventh Arrondissement since 1859.

Known for its large portions and friendly atmosphere, Josephine Chez Dumonet greets guests with joking waiters that speak a little English, and kitchen staff that will gladly stand for a picture.

Situated in the Seventh Arrondissement, this small, lively bistro is often lauded as the best in Paris. Run by celebrated chef Stéphane Jego, the restaurant serves authentic Basque fare in a traditional bistro-style setting with closely packed tables and an open kitchen.

Gilles Choukroun, the mediagenic chef of the new restaurant is the founder and former president of Générations.C—yet another French food movement for change—the boyishly handsome Choukroun is doing his part at the cool gray-and-fuchsia-accented MBC.

Paris's temples of fine dining at reasonable prices are its brasseries, a cross between a café and a restaurant where simple dishes start around $20.

Named for its own address at 20 Rue de Bellechasse in the Seventh Arrondissement, Le 20 is a crowded, noisy, Art Deco-style bistro run by the young owners Jean-Phi and Tristan.

The Chef: Former musician/pizza maker Guy Martin was credited with resurrecting Le Grand Véfour—one of Paris’s oldest and most storied restaurants—in 2000, when it was the only restaurant to earn three stars from the annual Red Michelin Guide.

The aptly named L'As Du Fallafel ("the Ace of Falafel") is situated in the heart of the historically Jewish Marais neighborhood of Paris, a cobblestone landscape freckled by a dizzying number of falafel stands and kosher butchers.

Known for decades as Lucas Carton, Senderens occupies a site that's been home to Paris restaurants for three of the last four centuries.

On Rue Elzévir in the Marais district, near Rue des Francs-Bourgeois with its boutiques and Renaissance architecture, Valerie Schlumberger created La Compagnie du Sénégal et de l'Afrique de l'Ouest (Company of Senegal and West Africa) and Le Petit Dakar, which offers Senegalese and other cuisine.

With its always-surprising mix of art, high-tech gadgets, music, books, and individualistic curios, Colette has quite simply become the bellwether for all things stylish in the capital of style.

A bit off the beaten tourist track in the Batignolles area of the Seventeenth Arrondissement, Le Bistral is a rustic chic “gastro-restro” with a twist: The chefwho serves up inventive versions of French classicsis Japanese.

Almost hidden on a cobblestone side street in the Latin Quarter lies Le Coupe-Chou with a facade overgrown with ivy. Since 1962, this non-touristy oasis has served traditional French fare in a medieval setting of stone walls, brick floors, and exposed wood beams.