Paris

Restaurants in Paris

A folksy bar des huîtres near the Opera House, with cheesy murals of Mont Saint-Michel and piped-in recordings of seagulls. Sophisticated it is not, and yet you'll rarely find Belons so pristine.

Alain Ducasse at the Hôtel Plaza Athénée, owned by chef Alain Ducasse, blends the finest French cuisine and impeccable interior design, providing the perfect atmosphere for romantic Parisian meals.

A Mexican restaurant in the heart of St.-Germain-des-Prés. It may seem an unlikely cuisine for one of Paris’s quaintest quartiers, but young French people go absolutely crazy over it—the place is always packed.

On the north side of Montmartre down a Rue Custine side street, this off-the-beaten-path wine bar and bistro specializes in authentic, family-style French cuisine.

Flowery Art Nouveau wall tiles dialogue quietly with Guimard’s sensational verdigris entrance to the Châtelet Métro station, seen through windows daubed with leaves and clusters of grapes.

Argentine chef Raquel Carena studied with Breton chef Olivier Roellinger, and now she serves Le Baratin’s guests fare like red tuna tartare with black cherries and foie gras with lentils. Near the Pyrenees subway station, this authentic wine bar is owned by Philippe Pinoteau.

Facing the 17th-century Théâtre du Palais Royal, this 30-seat bistro is just a short walk from the Eiffel Tower. Beveled mirrors, faux leather banquettes, and crisp white linens evoke the 1930’s.

One of the city’s most celebrated restaurants, Spring is owned and operated by Chicago-born, French-trained chef Daniel Rose. In 2010, the already-renowned restaurant reopened in a 17th-century building in the First Arrondissement, just one block from the Louvre.

This authentic French bistro dating to 1912 has played host to every Parisian mayor of the past century. Just steps from the city's Hotel de Ville (town hall), Benoit was run by a single family for three generations before being obtained by Alain Ducasse's restaurant group in 2005.

Tapas-style dining is the mark of Le Salon d'Hélène, as is the southwest France cuisine created by the salon’s Basque chef-owner Hélène Darroze, who comes from a family of hotel and restaurant owners.

At the original Angelina location near the Louvre, patrons sit elbow-to-elbow in the Belle Époque dining room, with its sweeping archways, chandeliers, gold accents, and dramatic lighting.

Considered the epicenter of the bistronomy movement, La Régalade opened in 1992 under the direction of Yves Camdeborde, champion of the French back-to-basics culinary revolution. Chef Bruno Doucet now carries on the tradition.

A popular way to view the City of Lights is at night aboard the Don Juan II, a 1931 yacht where intimate gatherings of no more than 40 dine in leather seats among antique paintings and soft lighting.

Food doesn’t come more traditionally Parisian than at this old school Les Halles bistro, commonly referred to as Chez Denise. Hearty portions of rustic French fare served on red-checked tablecloths focus on large, meaty offerings like offal, foie gras, marrow bones, and a steak tartare with a fol

Located in the city's hip Golden Triangle, this gem is hidden away down a cobblestone alley and tucked into the corner of a courtyard (watch for a square, black sign hanging above the alley's entrance on Rue St. Honore).