Paris

Restaurants in Paris

KGB

Here, striped Basque runners on tables and a wine list scrawled on distressed mirrors set the mood for chef Julien Duboué’s playful exuberance: a cheeky boudin noir “napoleon” richly layered with apples; a whole magret (duck breast) baked on a bed of grape leaves atop a clay roof shingle.

The Place du Trocadéro, strategic for its view of the Eiffel Tower, has a multitude of café terraces from which to admire it, but only one is an institution.

This Alsatian brasserie in the 17th arrondissement has been around since 1925 and continues to specialize in seafood, particularly shellfish.

Tough to beat for ambiance, this hip and lively Spanish restaurant on the banks of the Seine brings a bit of old Madrid to the city of lights.

Epicure in Paris’s Hôtel Le Bristol evolves as the seasons change.

The Scene: Seattle transplants Braden (a chef) and Laura (a baker) worried about making friends after their move to Paris last year. Their ingenious answer: throw dinner parties, and lots of them.

Whether seated in the sunlight by the front windows, at the center room's bar, or beneath the back section's glass ceiling, diners find the red and gray decor and neo-bistro dishes reflected in Le Miroir's numerous framed mirrors (hence the name).

KGB

One lofty dining room, decorated with bright and bold contemporary paintings on every available wall, serves as the annex to chef William Ledeuil’s wildly popular Ze Kitchen Galerie in St. Germain.

Situated within the tourist-site triumvirate of the Tuilieries, the Louvre, and the Palais Royal, Cibus offers upscale Italian dining in an atmosphere so warm and homey you'll find it hard to believe you're dining out. The interior space is tiny, seating no more than 16.

A go-to bistro for the trendy locals of Marais, Café Charlot is housed in a former bakery across from the Marche des Enfants Rouge—literally the “Market of Red Children,” the oldest food market in Paris.

At Les Ombres is known for its close-up views of the Eiffel Tower, whose metal architecture the restaurant seems to mimic with its geometric, glass ceiling. Indeed, “Les Ombres” means “the shadows,” referring to those cast by the neighboring tower.