Paris

Restaurants in Paris

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Argentine chef Raquel Carena studied with Breton chef Olivier Roellinger, and now she serves Le Baratin’s guests fare like red tuna tartare with black cherries and foie gras with lentils. Near the Pyrenees subway station, this authentic wine bar is owned by Philippe Pinoteau.

A folksy bar des huîtres near the Opera House, with cheesy murals of Mont Saint-Michel and piped-in recordings of seagulls. Sophisticated it is not, and yet you'll rarely find Belons so pristine.

Alain Ducasse at the Hôtel Plaza Athénée, owned by chef Alain Ducasse, blends the finest French cuisine and impeccable interior design, providing the perfect atmosphere for romantic Parisian meals.

A Mexican restaurant in the heart of St.-Germain-des-Prés. It may seem an unlikely cuisine for one of Paris’s quaintest quartiers, but young French people go absolutely crazy over it—the place is always packed.

On the north side of Montmartre down a Rue Custine side street, this off-the-beaten-path wine bar and bistro specializes in authentic, family-style French cuisine.

Flowery Art Nouveau wall tiles dialogue quietly with Guimard’s sensational verdigris entrance to the Châtelet Métro station, seen through windows daubed with leaves and clusters of grapes.

Located right by Cimetiere du Montparnasse in the 14th arrondissement, Le Duc restaurant has been frequented by the likes of Diane von Furstenberg and the late President Mitterrand, who come to sample the fresh seafood.

The food of France’s Breton region shines at Chez Michel.

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One lofty dining room, decorated with bright and bold contemporary paintings on every available wall, serves as the annex to chef William Ledeuil’s wildly popular Ze Kitchen Galerie in St. Germain.

Situated within the tourist-site triumvirate of the Tuilieries, the Louvre, and the Palais Royal, Cibus offers upscale Italian dining in an atmosphere so warm and homey you'll find it hard to believe you're dining out. The interior space is tiny, seating no more than 16.

A go-to bistro for the trendy locals of Marais, Café Charlot is housed in a former bakery across from the Marche des Enfants Rouge—literally the “Market of Red Children,” the oldest food market in Paris.