Paris

Restaurants in Paris

KGB

Known for decades as Lucas Carton, Senderens occupies a site that's been home to Paris restaurants for three of the last four centuries.

On Rue Elzévir in the Marais district, near Rue des Francs-Bourgeois with its boutiques and Renaissance architecture, Valerie Schlumberger created La Compagnie du Sénégal et de l'Afrique de l'Ouest (Company of Senegal and West Africa) and Le Petit Dakar, which offers Senegalese and other cuisine.

With its always-surprising mix of art, high-tech gadgets, music, books, and individualistic curios, Colette has quite simply become the bellwether for all things stylish in the capital of style.

A bit off the beaten tourist track in the Batignolles area of the Seventeenth Arrondissement, Le Bistral is a rustic chic “gastro-restro” with a twist: The chefwho serves up inventive versions of French classicsis Japanese.

Almost hidden on a cobblestone side street in the Latin Quarter lies Le Coupe-Chou with a facade overgrown with ivy. Since 1962, this non-touristy oasis has served traditional French fare in a medieval setting of stone walls, brick floors, and exposed wood beams.

Owned by actor Gérard Depardieu and his former paramour Carole Bouquet, this brilliantly colored restaurant is known for offering some of the best oyster platters, shellfish, and seafood in the city.

The frayed, yellowed menu posted in the window of Aux Fins Gourmet hints at the long history of this classic French bistro, located in the Seventh Arrondissement.

This popular eating spot is located in the Marché des Enfants Rouges, a bustling open-air market in the hip, less-touristed neighborhood of Le Marais. The market, the oldest in Paris, has been around since the early 1600's and features cheese-mongers, fresh produce, and vintners.

Located on a side street just north of the Tuileries Garden and few steps from the John Galliano and Colette fashion boutiques, Le Rubis is one of the neighborhood's top wine bars.

The "heep-ster" atmosphere at lunch is abso-lutely intolerable (unless you happen to be one, in which case turn on your laptop and start smoking your brains out), but the freestanding, monumental horseshoe of a zinc at Le Pure Café has got to be seen.