Palermo Viejo

Palermo Viejo Travel Guide

The streets between Plazoleta Cortázar and Plaza Palermo Viejo are packed with stylish boutiques. Stop by Calma Chica for cowhide pillows.

Pretty without being pretentious, the Buenos Aires horse-racing track bears witness to the elegance that once surrounded the sport.

There’s a blue Vespa parked just inside the door of Las Oreiro, owned by actor and singer Natalia Oreiro. Inside, the structural columns are covered in polka dots, and a canopy of crystals dangles over the cash register.

The streets between Plazoleta Cortázar and Plaza Palermo Viejo are packed with stylish boutiques. Stop by Mishka for affordable sandals.

 

Built in 1914 (and temporarily closed until December 2008), this beautiful park—with its Rosedal rose garden and a delicate white wooden bridge crossing a figure-eight lake—serves as ground zero for sun-loving Argentines on weekend strolls.

The shoes here are intended for Buenos Aires' signature "sexy girl" crowd: on a tufted-velvet pouf in the center of a fuchsia jewel box, Porteñas slip into high sandals embellished with jewels and strips of metallic snakeskin that cost a mere $175.

After 10 years on Palermo Viejo’s Plaza Julio Cortázar—a small plaza that’s the epicenter of Buenos Aires nightlife—this artsy bar has perfected the formula for keeping drinkers happy: simple wooden tables, ample exposed brick, affordable drinks, and attentive but informal service.

Recharge with a frothy concoction (grapefruit-lemongrass-spirulina, perhaps) at this new juice bar, adored by the neighborhood’s skinny-jeans brigade for its cozy patio and yogurt muffins loaded with blueberries from the owners’ farm.

Seco has clear plastic coats edged in red and white checks, matching checked plastic bucket hats, and other wet-weather gear you’ve never seen before.

The streets between Plazoleta Cortázar and Plaza Palermo Viejo are packed with stylish boutiques. Stop by Papelera Palermo for fine handmade paper goods.

Some 25 years ago, antiquarian Ricardo Paz visited the dry forest of northern Argentina and found villages of artisans turning out colorful textiles and organic wood and leather furniture—a tradition that died down when the region was deforested to make way for farms.

Argentina's leading folk musicians stamp out complex rhythms at Palermo's popular music hall.

Walk down a short corridor and ring the bell to enter Nadine Zlotogora, where a rich-hippie aesthetic rules. The frothy confections—tiered black dotted-Swiss dresses and speckled cotton knit blazers—avoid saccharine territory by being paired with the shop’s line of high-top sneakers.