Outside Tokyo

Things to do in Outside Tokyo

In this minimalist space, an attendant seats guests along a row of self-serve tanks that pump exotically flavored oxygen, from eucalyptus menthol to cinnamon, into your lungs; choose from 10-minute (600 yen/$6) and 20-minute (1,200 yen/$12.50) sessions. The benefit?

These reflexology and massage stations—there are four in total, spread throughout the airport’s two terminals—are removed from general foot traffic. Comfortable massage chairs are spaced far enough apart so you almost buy into the illusion of privacy—if you close your eyes.

At almost 38,000 square feet, Narita Nakamise is the largest airport duty-free boutique mall in Japan, linking 19 full-blown stores, including fashion bigwigs Cartier, Hermès, Salvatore Ferragamo, Tiffany, and Coach.

Departing passengers who have gone through passport control can take advantage of the airport’s official relaxation areas, which include a bright waiting room (think polished wood floors, blue benches, and white walls), an adjacent “comfort corner” outfitted with mirrored vanities, and 13 tiny si

International Japanese jewelry chain Tasaki Shinju specializes in pieces made from high-quality pearls. Browse the carefully curated collection of bracelets, necklaces, and earrings made from both salt- and fresh-water pearls.

To calm your preflight jitters, head to one of the airport’s seven clusters of black full-body electric massage chairs spaced about six feet apart.

The airport’s largest bookstore—with titles in both Japanese and English—is impeccably organized and also carries DVDs, CDs, and video games. Pick up IQ84, the latest novel from celebrated Japanese writer Haruki Murakami.

If you’re traveling with a group, consider renting one of the airport’s 26 private lounges, complete with cushioned chairs, coffee tables, at least one television (you can ask the reservations desk for a DVD player), and a wall of windows.

This centrally located store offers easy one-stop shopping for those looking for travel-related electronics: translation machines with voice output to headphones, memory chips for your camera, and more.

Simplicity rules at the 750-square-foot outpost of Muji, the popular Japanese accessories giant.

Two high-tech skating rinks, plus a museum with artifacts from the 1998 Winter Olympic Games, which were held in the city.

The airport has several free kid-friendly (and unsupervised) areas, so find the one that best suits your needs.