Outside Sydney

Things to do in Outside Sydney

Exhibiting edgy and often controversial Contemporary art is the mission of this Paddington gallery, which opened in 1982. In particular, Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery highlights Asia-Pacific artist, especially in Japan, New Zealand, and Australia.

She began her career working in costumes for the Australian Broadcasting Commission, but in 1990, Collette started out on her own with a lingerie line, using fabric from France that is hand-embroidered in Bombay, India.

Sarah-Jane Clarke and Heidi Middleton, the Aussie duo behind this young, hip women’s wear label, first made their name with jeans (in particular, the low-rise variety so popular in the early 2000’s).

This Darlinghurst neighborhood gallery has dedicated itself to promoting the provocative and edgy works of artists, both well-established and up-and-coming, within the Contemporary art form.

Visitors looking to slip “the surly bonds of earth” seek out this aeronautical operation, which started in 1996 and is now run by pilot/owner Steve Krug, who has been taking wing since 1974 and has thousands of water landings on his résumé.

Brace Yourself: Australia’s Gold Coast is a little off the map for most people, but if you are in the neighborhood, head for this: the fastest, tallest thrill ride in the Southern Hemisphere (and at 100 mph, the fourth fastest in the world).

Located in Woollahra, this gallery showcases the work of 20th- and 21st-century Australian artists.

Located on the site of the first European settlement on New South Wales’ coast, this former convict village now supports the largest and only five-star wine producer in the region, with 126 trophies and more than 1,400 awards to its name.

Named for Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas, you can browse used books, settle into a comfy couch, or munch on “modern Australian cuisine” like mushroom and leek soup or sweet soy chicken with broccoli; there’s no menu, just a changing list of a dozen specials.

With four bars and a Thai restaurant, this nightlife spot combines an Art Deco background with the vibe of a 21st-century dance club.

The temple belongs to the Taiwanese Fo Guang Shan sect. Said to be the Southern Hemisphere’s largest Buddhist shrine, it’s billed as an international tourist attraction; busloads of Asian visitors mill the grounds yet the temple maintains an overwhelming sense of serenity, almost solitude.

Grab your “cossie” (swimming “costume”) and take a surfing lesson with the experts at Let's Go Surfing.

 

Cost: $75 per person for a two-hour five-person group lesson with a “soft surfboard."

Officially christened in 2005, this stretch along the Tasman Sea is part of a government effort to redirect leisure travelers south of Sydney onto a coastal highway.

The dramatic coastline views along the winding path to the century-old Cape Byron Lighthouse are worth the hike.

According to Guinness World Records, this beach on the shores of Jervis Bay has the whitest sand in the world. Its natural beauty is further enhanced by national parks to the north and botanic gardens to the south, giving the beach an unspoiled feel.