Outside San Francisco

Restaurants in Outside San Francisco

San Francisco’s hottest pizza joint has expanded with A16 Rockridge, which turns out chewy pies from a hand-built oven. We love the Montanara Rockridge—lightly fried dough, smoked tomato sauce, burrata, and basil. BART stop: Rockridge

Set in an 1896 building with original mosaic floors, Desco is known for its Italian standards, including house-made-pasta dishes such as lamb-cheek pappardelle. BART stop: 12th Street/Oakland City Center

Meat-centric small plates reign at Box and Bells, the latest from chef James Syhabout of Michelin-starred Commis. Try the country pork rillettes and blood pudding poutine. BART stop: Rockridge

Arrive early on Tuesday afternoons for the fried chicken stuffed with herbs at Miss Ollie’s. The day’s special at this airy, Cali-Caribbean spot goes fast. BART stop: 12th Street/Oakland City Center

The retro diner Hopscotch puts a Japanese spin on hearty American dishes. Take the soba ragù, with buckwheat noodles, braised pork, Manchego, and shiso. BART station: 19th Street/Uptown Oakland

Proof that Oakland has NoCal’s buzziest restaurant scene? Its new nickname: Brooklyn West. Honoring Alice Waters’s ethos is Ramen Shop, owned by three Chez Panisse alums. Creative noodle soups spotlight homegrown produce such as Meyer lemons and chanterelles. BART stop: Rockridge

At Duende, chef Paul Canales channels his Basque heritage into pintxos and paellas in a whimsical setting (colorful murals; fence posts as floorboards). BART stop: 19th Street/Uptown Oakland

Located in the Ritz-Carlton Half Moon Bay, this upscale restaurant serves coastal-inspired California cuisine amid panoramic views of the Pacific Ocean.

An offshoot of the Cheese Board Collective and located just two doors down, the Cheese Board Pizzeria makes only one kind of vegetarian pizza each day in a limited quantity.

On Oakland’s restaurant row, in the Temescal neighborhood, this tapas bar serves authentic small plates from Catalonia—pa amb tomàquet; patatas bravas—accompanied by an all-Spanish wine list.

Overlooking Tomales Bay, this cash-only seafood joint is housed in a one-story white building on a wooden boardwalk that runs along the waterfront. Open since 1948, the iconic restaurant is a popular stop for visitors traveling along Highway One.

The most famous of the Marshall oyster purveyors sells unshucked oysters—but unfortunately they charge $5 per person merely to sit at a picnic table.

In a heritage building made cozy with plush burgundy mohair chairs and a wide, limestone fireplace, The Village Pub has one Michelin star for its locally sourced American cuisine. A nearby ranch provides much of the fresh produce—be it the heirloom tomatoes, cantaloupe, or organic beets.