The Home Counties

Hotels in The Home Counties

There’s no shortage of history at the Red Lion; thought to have been built around 1531, it’s reported to have hosted King Charles I, Queen Wilhemina, and King George III.

The counterpart to Sanctum Soho in London, the land where this nine-room, red-brick hotel sits, is owned by a rock-and-roll promoter; appropriate since the wealthy Berkshire area tends to attract musicians looking for a home near highways and Heathrow.

With history dating back to 3,000 B.C. (pottery found on the grounds), this hotel has played many roles: residence, boarding school, secret military headquarters, and gardening school are just a few.

This coaching inn’s history runs back to the 12th century, and the common areas form the activity hub of the 50-room location.

This wood-framed coaching inn seamlessly blends in with its historic surroundings near the River Misbourne.

Gravetye Manor is not only one of the first country houses to transform into a sophisticated hotel, but these 1,000 acres were also once home (and testing ground) to one of England’s most famed gardeners, William Robinson.

Housed in a mid-18th-century coaching inn, this Ribble Valley B&B is known as much for its food as for its three guest rooms.

This grand Italianate manor was home to three Dukes, an Earl, a Prince of Wales, and the Viscounts Astor—and hosted Queen Victoria and Charlie Chaplin—before its swimming pool landed it a key role in the Profumo affair which brought down the British government in the 1960s. It’s also gorgeous: im

The 19th-century farmstead features vaulted ceilings and large stone fireplaces.

The village of Chalfont St. Giles is “country England” at its most quintessential, and this cozy, 11-room hotel near the Chiltern hills provides a comfortable stay near the Buckinghamshire neighborhood.

Love is in the air at this reinvented Georgian manor set on 240 acres of private parkland near Windsor Castle, 45 minutes outside London. In fact, the very sentiment is spelled out in capital letters in the contemporary light fixture over the bar.

This palatial house has served many purposes, from private estate and RAF officer housing to corporate office; it became today’s hotel in July 1991. The “Danesfield” moniker derives from the Danish wanderers that once camped on the grounds, which now has 65 acres of garden space.