Oregon

Things to do in Oregon

It’s no surprise that many of the most unforgettable things to do in Oregon take place in the great outdoors. The state boasts thousands of acres of state and national parks, filled with verdant forests, crystalline alpine lakes and more, all primed for hiking, camping and biking. Windsurfers congregate on the Columbia River each summer, an area where moments on land can be spent strolling through the scenic Hood River, a hotspot for artists, or hiking to the top of Multnomah Falls, which towers more than 600 feet.

For snow bunnies, a list of things to do in Oregon includes powdery slopes on Mount Bachelor and Mount Hood. Other state landmarks include the Painted Hills to the east, Crater Lake its central Cascade Range, and a myriad of cliff-side vantages along its rugged coastline. Plan a day’s visit to the Tillamook Cheese Factory for fresh cheddar or window shop at artisan boutiques up north in Astoria.

A list of what to do in Oregon wouldn’t be complete without a mention of Portland and its offbeat attractions. Reserve a table at one of its many foodie-favored restaurants, breathe fresh air in its International Test Rose Garden and stop in at Powell’s City of Books, the largest independent bookstore in the country. The riverside Oregon Museum of Science & Industry is another popular draw.

For oenophiles, an itinerary of what to do in Oregon revolves around the Willamette Valley and the hundreds of vineyards that call it home. Taste its world-famous pinots straight from the barrel and pair them with first-rate cuisine.

The quality of the productions here is uniformly high. Check out something modern here; this year, perhaps Sarah Ruhl’s well-regarded Dead Man’s Cell Phone.

Mix it up and take in a more traditional performance, too, at the open-air Elizabethan Stage.

Sokol Blosser is pushing the green envelope with its certified organic vineyard, solar panels, and a new 5,000-square-foot tasting room that architect Brad Cloepfil of Allied Works Architecture is hoping will achieve “Living Building” status.

If you’re looking for a ’60s Pendleton wool dress or a groovy Pendleton overcoat (with fur collar and leather buttons), stop by Rag & Bones. The boutique, owned by Thistle restaurant owners Eric Bechard and Emily Howard, sells only American-made vintage clothing, most of it wool.

Founded in 1997 by Walter Jaffe and Paul King, White Bird is a non-profit organization dedicated to supporting local dance companies while also bringing national and international groups to perform in Portland.

Thoughtful urban planning has turned Portland’s relatively compact, park-studded downtown into far more than just a business district. Home to most of the city’s hotels and major arts institutions, it’s vibrant and abuzz seven days a week.

Woodsy lodge on a sandy spit offering an exhaustive list of outdoor activities, along with great Siletz Bay and Pacific Ocean views.


This charming shop stocks 97 flavors of saltwater taffy.

Expecting parents Sara Chun and Ben Cavalcanti opened their Portland-based online shop in 2008 to sell kitty-shaped crayons that are easy for infants to grip and made with sustainable materials, including soy and beeswax.

The company leads daily excursions to Boyd Cave, an 1,800-foot-long lava tube that snakes beneath the desert floor.

Channel Lawrence of Arabia at the John Dellenback Dunes Trail, where the sand mountains are astonishingly high.

The huge flagship store of this Portland-based outerwear and sportswear company sells durable, rugged gear, clothing, footwear (the Titanium Daska Pass Omni-Techs are a favorite of hard-core hikers), mountain bikes, camping equipment, water-resistant watches, and everything else you might need to

Don't leave Bend without visiting Mount Bachelor, which consistently tops ski bibles' lists of the finest peaks in the Northwest. In April, the powder is still deep and fine; a full-day lift ticket is $49.