Oregon

Oregon Travel Guide

Sokol Blosser is pushing the green envelope with its certified organic vineyard, solar panels, and a new 5,000-square-foot tasting room that architect Brad Cloepfil of Allied Works Architecture is hoping will achieve “Living Building” status.

If you’re looking for a ’60s Pendleton wool dress or a groovy Pendleton overcoat (with fur collar and leather buttons), stop by Rag & Bones. The boutique, owned by Thistle restaurant owners Eric Bechard and Emily Howard, sells only American-made vintage clothing, most of it wool.

The quality of the productions here is uniformly high. Check out something modern here; this year, perhaps Sarah Ruhl’s well-regarded Dead Man’s Cell Phone.

Mix it up and take in a more traditional performance, too, at the open-air Elizabethan Stage.

A black awning and sidewalk tables greet visitors to Sarah Hart’s Spanish-inspired chocolate shop, promising “(mostly) sin free chocolate.” Alma is both "soul" in Spanish and refers to Hart’s grandmother, who taught her to bake.

Thanks to a growing colony of trendy bars and terrific restaurants around the intersection with 28th Street, this formerly industrial area has become increasingly vibrant and popular.

The guides at First Ascent will teach you the ABCs of climbing on the dramatic spires of Smith Rock, located just north of town.

This brick-fronted restaurant and nightclub in Southeast Portland has a stage for performers, a shimmering disco ball, and rows of artistic panels that dangle down the side of blue walls.

Occupying a forested ridge high above downtown Portland, this park has enough sights and attractions that it’s easy to spend a full day here.

The Spread: Portland ranks No. 2 for farmers' markets in our America's Favorite Cities Survey, and this Saturday hot spot is the epicenter for Oregonian locavores.

At the “Junior Naturalists” exhibit where kids can inspect fossils and handle lizards.

Rent an ATV for the dunes.