Oregon Travel Guide

The quality of the productions here is uniformly high. Check out something modern here; this year, perhaps Sarah Ruhl’s well-regarded Dead Man’s Cell Phone.

Mix it up and take in a more traditional performance, too, at the open-air Elizabethan Stage.

Sokol Blosser is pushing the green envelope with its certified organic vineyard, solar panels, and a new 5,000-square-foot tasting room that architect Brad Cloepfil of Allied Works Architecture is hoping will achieve “Living Building” status.

If you’re looking for a ’60s Pendleton wool dress or a groovy Pendleton overcoat (with fur collar and leather buttons), stop by Rag & Bones. The boutique, owned by Thistle restaurant owners Eric Bechard and Emily Howard, sells only American-made vintage clothing, most of it wool.

The Museum: During a 1998 reading at the Voodoo Museum in New Orleans, the concept of a museum dedicated to velvet paintings was discussed, and since then, Caren Anderson and Carl Baldwin, now museum co-owners, began collecting, opening the Velveteria in 2005.

This spirit producer dates to 2007 and is part of Southeast Portland’s Distillery Row. The green-fronted space with a criss-crossed dragon logo is only open to the public on Saturdays from noon until 5 p.m., or by appointment.

Rent an ATV for the dunes.

A dark little wine bar where diners eat baked chèvre and chicken-liver-and-currant mousse paired with Muscadet.

Musher Jerry Scdoris leads daily dog-sledding excursions.

The store looks like an innocuous gift shop but hides within it an outlandish library of exotic salts curated by salt “selmelier” Mark Bitterman.

Years as agent: 21. Specialties: England, India, South Africa. Consulting fee: From $500.

Fly fisherman Peter Bowers, owner of the Patient Angler, swears that what he'll teach you in a 90-minute crash course would take you three years to learn on your own; when you're done, he'll set you up with a rod, reel, and map of the best local holes.