Oregon

Restaurants in Oregon

Oregon’s eco-friendly reputation spills over into local cuisine. The state is a haven for the farm-to-table movement, and many Oregon restaurants stock their pantries exclusively with organic ingredients sourced from the region. With beef, salmon, crab, berries, hazelnuts, potatoes and wine all within arm’s reach, the practice leads to some delicious results.

Portland is a mecca for foodies, and many of the best restaurants in Oregon are found in its urban center.

Northeast’s buzzy Beast restaurant offers nightly seatings at communal tables to show off the culinary artistry of its James Beard award-winning chef, Naomi Pomeroy, and all of the ingredients in its five and six-course prix-fixe meals are sustainably sourced. For more exotic flavors, check out restaurants in Oregon like Portland’s Andina, which specializes in Peruvian small plates. Other Portland must-sees include Huber’s, the oldest restaurant in the city that’s been open since 1879. Here, bartenders turn Spanish coffees into a tableside show, and cocktails come with complimentary sandwiches.

What’s more, Portland boasts the highest concentration of microbreweries in the country. Plenty of standout Oregon restaurants can be found in more rural locations. Stop in at a bakery in a small coastal town or taste award-winning fare at vineyard-adjacent eateries for fare that’s dashed with a little extra local flavor.

In 2007, Nate Tilden and Matt Piacentini opened their “domestic and foreign” restaurant on trendy Ace Hotel's ground floor, boasting high ceilings, communal wood tables, and a destination bar.

Jeana Edelman and David Yudkin started building their pizza-fueled empire in 1984 and now have five pizzerias throughout the city, including this glass-fronted Southeast Portland branch with giant lipstick kisses on the windows.

The locations is part of the popular family-friendly McMenamins chain, where you can chow down on burgers and sandwiches amid railroading memorabilia.

Lucy Brennan opened the Mint, a 40-seat Latin and Mediterranean-tinged bistro, in 2001 in the city's historic Frederick Torgler Building and derived its name from the Greek symbol for hospitality.

The restaurant has the best wine list in Bend, and hearty dishes like lavender-injected rack of pork served with mission figs.

A small-scale, pure-hearted restaurant that has no stove. What it’s got is a wood-burning oven inherited from the space’s last incarnation, a short-lived pizza joint.

The small and celebrated Lower Burnside space is half civilized bistro and half culinary crack den, where your darkest desires (foie gras torchon with buttermilk pancakes? Sweetbreads with blue cheese?) are indulged.

Opened in the city's northern St Johns neighborhood in 2006, this vegan establishment houses a market that showcases organic produce, plus a café with art-lined yellow walls.

This American brasserie and bar in Portland’s Pearl District has a green and glass front and limited seating on a railed-in former loading dock, whlie the interior has wood floors, art-lined walls, and an active bar.

Dine on seared albacore on the river-view deck.

Andy Ricker’s northern Thai restaurant in Southeast Portland started as a cart, before expanding and spawning nearby Whiskey Soda Lounge and Pok Pok Noi. The exterior has a corrugated metal roof and picnic table seating, while the interior has wood-panelled walls and brick-backed banquettes.