Ontario

Ontario Travel Guide

Established in 1876 by the Ontario Society of Artists, the Ontario College of Art & Design (OCAD) in downtown Toronto has grown to become the third largest professional art and design school in North America.

The namesake store of the trendy Drake Hotel, this nontraditional gift shop sells a wide array of unusual souvenirs, original antiques, local art, and items imported from across the globe.

Located in Beaconsfield Village, Virginia Johnson's eponymous shop showcases the illustrator and textile artist's silkscreens on a variety of fashionable media.

This three-year public outdoor art installation—on the airport grounds and easily visible on the drive to and from the terminals—includes large-scale sculptures by Michel de Broin, Carl Skelton, and Ilan Sandler.

The airport’s jostling crowds make it easy to forget that Toronto’s landscapes were once completely inhabited by Inuit peoples, like the indigenous Nunavut.

At 1,815-feet and 5-inches, the CN Tower is the world's tallest free-standing tower (defined as a building where less than 50% of the construction is usable floor space).

Formerly GAP Adventures. 

Located within the Sheraton Gateway Hotel, which adjoins Pearson International Airport's Terminal 3, this small salon has a menu of pampering services for weary travelers. The full treament menu includes everything from hair cuts to facials, even tanning.

Displayed in Terminal 1, this glimmering, double-sided figure was created by local sculptor Harold Town in 1963. Comprised of 60 individual panels of brass, the 8-by-20-foot sculpture is etched with intricate, abstract patterns that resemble cryptic hieroglyphics.

Where It Is: Lake Huron’s icy waters preserve sunken ships for decades with little disturbance. Fathom Five Marine Park, a land and water reserve on Lake Huron’s Georgian Bay at the end of the Bruce Peninsula, is a four-hour drive north of Toronto.

The only Canadian museum dedicated solely to ceramics, the Gardiner showcases a collection of more than 3,000 pieces, ranging from ancient Mayan figurines to 17th-century English Delftware and dynamic contemporary pieces.

Hidden behind a narrow storefront in Little Portugal, this unassuming bar is marked by a large sign that reads Nazare Snack Bar (the building’s previous inhabitant) as well as a discreet chalkboard sign revealing the current name. As such, the clientele is largely limited to in-the-know locals.

This downtown cocktail bar takes its style cues from Manhattan's circa-1950s and -60s cocktail lounges with sleek black booths and wallpaper featuring old magazine covers.