Oahu

Oahu Travel Guide

Located in Chinatown, this Honolulu department store is easily recognizable by the words “LAI FONG” written in large red letters across the building’s slightly worn, white façade.

What: This family-owned shop in Sunset Beach is splashed with a deep-sea graffiti mural.

Who: The Nakamuras serve solid renditions of fish sandwiches and bento boxes of chicken katsu or teriyaki beef.

The Honolulu Museum of Art is home to a 60,000-piece collection of art, with an emphasis on Asian works, including Buddhist and Shinto sculptures and Korean ceramics. More than 10,000 examples of Japanese ukiyo-ewoodblock prints comprise the James A. Michener collection.

Henry Adaniya might be the city’s most improbable new restaurateur. He closed his acclaimed Chicago restaurant Trio—where chefs Rick Tramonto and Grant Achatz made their names—to bring the upscale hot dog craze to Honolulu in 2007.

Part Irish pub and part local Hawaiian eatery, Murphy’s Bar and Grill is a casual neighborhood gathering spot for local businesspeople and residents. The bar serves 16 beers on tap, as well as a selection of wines.

Established in 1952 by the grandson of Portuguese immigrants, Leonard’s is best known for its malasadas, traditional Portuguese pastries made of fried dough rolled in sugar or filled with puddings.

What to Expect: Framed by Diamond Head, one of the world’s most climbed (extinct) volcanoes, and with nearly two miles of continuous white sand and palm trees, this iconic beach is almost always full of tourists and surfers.

In the 1990’s the project committed $585 million in public and private funds to transform eight acres of dive bars and budget hotels within an elbow of land framed by Lewers Street, Fort DeRussy Park, and Kalakaua Avenue.

Tobacco heiress Doris Duke stipulated in her will that her opulent and fanciful home (called Shangri La) on the shores of Diamond Head be turned into a museum.

The Veranda at the Kahala Hotel & Resort transports guests to a bygone era in Hawaii’s history. This plantation-inspired lounge overlooks the resort’s Dolphin Lagoon with both indoor and and al fresco seating.

Mokuleia is a popular destination for water activities including kite- and wind-surfing in south winds, snorkeling, camping, and hiking. Located on the North Shore just off Farrington Highway, this narrow beach has views of the mountains across the highway.

Opened in 1994, this eatery has been at the forefront of Chinatown’s trendy renaissance.

Charles Yee Hoy and staff have been selling antiques at a pair of shops in downtown Kailua for over 25 years. Their first store draws from the mainland and around the globe, and the spinoff around the corner sticks to Hawaii.

Ride TheBus, and stop at historic Diamond Head Lighthouse, on the Eastern end of Waikiki Beach.

Make the trip to the zoo, pausing to inspect a massive immobile tortoise taking a dust bath, then gawping at the unlikely spectacle of an ambulating landmass, which turns out to be a black rhinoceros.