North Carolina

Hotels in North Carolina

Childress Vineyards, Yadkin’s newest winery, is owned by legendary NASCAR team owner Richard Childress and consists of a 65-acre vineyard and winery and will include a hotel complex.

Innkeepers Peter and Lori White, who have owned bakeries in Palm Beach and Martha's Vineyard, serve three-course breakfasts (raisin scones with clotted cream, apple crisp) every morning.

Tranquil property with art-filled public spaces on 12 wooded acres, 15 minutes from downtown Raleigh. The outdoor pool backed by pin oaks and a three-acre lake resembles an Alpine spa.

Make yourself at home at this intimate bed and breakfast set among gardens. The five guest rooms are filled with homey antiques; two have oversize tubs.

The Sanderling Resort is the only full service resort in North Carolina’s Outer Banks, one of the country’s best coastlines for sand dunes, secluded beaches, and waterfront wildlife.

Large, activities-filled resort on 5,000 acres that is a golfer's mecca, with 8 championship courses and an excellent on-site school.

A short walk from Manteo’s downtown dock, the homey saltbox-style B&B has rooms reminiscent of Grandma’s.

Sustainable-agriculture farm with a three-room inn, set in the Blue Ridge Mountains; renowned for serving delicious “beyond organic” meals. Guests work up an appetite weeding, seeding, and hoeing the rows of spinach and watercress.

213-room inn on 8,000 acres that’s also home to the Biltmore House, George Vanderbilt’s 1895 château.

The 147-room Proximity Hotel was the first property in the country to achieve LEED Platinum certification. The structure, which uses about 45 percent less energy than comparable properties, has solar panels, heat-deflecting rooftop plants, and an eco-friendly elevator.

The last hinge may have been hung only in 2009, but this Tudor-style boutique hotel abutting George Vanderbilt’s 1895 Biltmore Estate resembles a 1920s hunting lodge—though one decorated by an eccentric art lover.

The whole family will like the sleek hotel, where rooms have French doors and large circular tubs. Even Rover is welcome, for a fee (from $75).

The central Highlands grounds of the Old Edwards Inn have deep hospitality roots—the property was originally a boarding house when it opened in 1878, though of course, much has changed.