New York

New York Travel Guide

Given New York’s size and diversity, just narrowing down your list of things to do in New York may be challenging. See the city like the newcomers did: Start with a harbor tour and then head over to Ellis Island and the Statue of Liberty. The panoramic views from Lady Liberty never cease to be thrilling. Fifth Avenue has the biggest names (and often the biggest prices), so what to do in New York if you don’t have limitless funds? Wander the boutiques in Soho and Greenwich Village, and shops in Chinatown, for quirkier and more economical finds. Don’t dismiss the outer boroughs, either. Queens has Jackson Heights, which is gaining a large following for great ethnic food, and the Bronx has the famed Bronx Zoo, as well as historical sights such as Edgar Allan Poe Cottage, the author's former home on the Grand Concourse.

Seeing the big museums has always been one of the big things to do in New York—but it can be overwhelming. At the Metropolitan Museum of Art, narrow your visit to a few collections and then take your time with them. Another don’t-miss is the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), or smaller museums like the Frick Collection on the Upper East Side.

As a quick side trip from the side—and an alternative to the hyped Hamptons— head to Greenport, on the North Fork in Suffolk County. It has a quaint village or inns and shops, and a fun Maritime festival in September. The Catskills and the Adirondacks offer endless outdoor things to do in New York: hiking trails, cool springs, and plenty of lodges or cabins where you can sit on a quiet porch that feels worlds away from the big city.

Housing 50 NYC-themed lanes, Bowlmor is part bowling alley, part nightclub. Beyond knocking down pins over drinks, there’s also the Stadium Grill Sports Bar and Restaurant, run by celeb chef David Burke.

The department store’s Chelsea location closed down in 1996, but this airy, edgy outpost—set inside a warehouse satisfies the needs of high-fashion shoppers. Both men and women head here for everything from designer jeans to of-the-minute accessories.

New York’s best bagel: an impossible award given the excess of this mouth-watering bread product throughout the five boroughs. But Murray’s comes pretty close—and its collection of freshly made, handcrafted poppy-, sesame seed-, onion-, and garlic- bagels have wowed Villagers for over a decade.

Since the tiny shop’s designs started showing up in photos of starlets and rockers a decade ago, the neighborhood’s secret is out but still worth a visit. Here you’ll find great dresses that are feminine without being girly, and well-structured without being stiff.

2011’s buzziest opening is reaching even bigger heights. An impressive lineup of International DJ stars (Sebastian Ingrosso; Wolfgang Gartner) draws a flashy late-night crowd that hangs in cabanas on the outdoor veranda.

Drink to Get: Champagne!

This floating museum is housed in a former U.S. aircraft carrier that served in WWII and Vietnam War. The ship retired in 1982 and, in that same year, the museum was opened.

This home décor store is the kind of place you can get lost in for hours. Every inch of space (ceiling included) is overflowing with charming gift-worthy items, such as brightly colored Yves Delorme mohair throws, owl-shaped salt and pepper shakers, and Savon de Marseille soaps.

Since 1963, this three-screen cinema has showcased a canon of cult classics—not to mention an eclectic mix of edgier flicks. Want to re-watch Mulholland Drive on the big screen? You may be in luck.

Some buildings are born to be icons. With its unique triangular “iron” shape, Beaux-Arts styling and bragging rights as one of New York’s first skyscrapers, The Flatiron Building’s eternal fame was secured from the beginning.

A summer camp for adults. Straight across the water from Surf Lodge, Ruschmeyer’s is a relative newcomer to the scene having opened in 2011.