New York

New York Travel Guide

Given New York’s size and diversity, just narrowing down your list of things to do in New York may be challenging. See the city like the newcomers did: Start with a harbor tour and then head over to Ellis Island and the Statue of Liberty. The panoramic views from Lady Liberty never cease to be thrilling. Fifth Avenue has the biggest names (and often the biggest prices), so what to do in New York if you don’t have limitless funds? Wander the boutiques in Soho and Greenwich Village, and shops in Chinatown, for quirkier and more economical finds. Don’t dismiss the outer boroughs, either. Queens has Jackson Heights, which is gaining a large following for great ethnic food, and the Bronx has the famed Bronx Zoo, as well as historical sights such as Edgar Allan Poe Cottage, the author's former home on the Grand Concourse.

Seeing the big museums has always been one of the big things to do in New York—but it can be overwhelming. At the Metropolitan Museum of Art, narrow your visit to a few collections and then take your time with them. Another don’t-miss is the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), or smaller museums like the Frick Collection on the Upper East Side.

As a quick side trip from the side—and an alternative to the hyped Hamptons— head to Greenport, on the North Fork in Suffolk County. It has a quaint village or inns and shops, and a fun Maritime festival in September. The Catskills and the Adirondacks offer endless outdoor things to do in New York: hiking trails, cool springs, and plenty of lodges or cabins where you can sit on a quiet porch that feels worlds away from the big city.

This tiny bakery is locals’ go-to spot to for sweet and savory baked goods on the weekends. A buzzing group of bakers in blue work jumpsuits hum along to the likes of Fleetwood Mac while churning out flaky almond croissants and crusty baguettes, that can sell out by 10:30 a.m.

Take a drive or paddle along part of the 12-mile Cayuga-Seneca Canal, teeming with bass, trout, and salmon.

If there’s a sport, you can probably play it at this expansive complex set along the Hudson River with facilities for everything from bowling and rock climbing to year-round ice skating and golf (especially popular because you get to whack balls into nets overlooking the water).

The New York flagship features an extensive collection of cameras, film, and accessories.

This beloved shop is a necessary stop for book lovers and anyone interested in the glory days of the East Village.

The equestrian-themed bar launched with Triple Crown viewing parties in a space decked with polo memorabilia and custom furniture from the Pennsylvania Amish. A trio of options—beer garden, lounge, or restaurant—serve sangria and Northeastern micro beers.

Every New Yorker loves a bar with an outdoor patio, and that’s exactly what you’ll find at Bamboo 52. Add to the mix a sushi bar and a well-priced happy hour, which runs from noon until 9 p.m., and you’ve got the makings of the perfect watering hole.

Robin Williams, Conan O’Brien, and Tina Fey have all graced the stage of this heralded 150-seat comedy venue, where shows take place seven nights a week, the tickets are cheap, and there’s no drink minimum.

With occupiers, hipsters, yuppies, NYU-loafers Washington Square Park—an iconic downtown landmark with its own “Arc de Triomphe”—is a mosaic of Village characters.

Check out Mark Twain’s octagonal study at Elmira College, which has artifacts such as his chair, documents, and several photos of nearby Quarry Farm, where he wrote.