New York

New York Travel Guide

This attractive (and nice-smelling) shop sells space-saving, stylish, and smart housewares. You don’t have to live in a closet-sized apartment to enjoy its great products. Open daily, around noon–around 7 pm.

Established in 1976, this non-profit is the largest in the world dedicated to the promotion of artist-made publications. Inside the brightly lit space, you’ll find 15,000 titles—plus rare reads.

Garden cocktails in a faux Ralph Lauren ad, this place is quintessential Hamptons. A handsome mahogany bar sits inside a seafood-centric restaurant helmed by Scott Kampf, but it’s the tree-fringed lawn that steals the show.

Everyone from local blues bands to Jimmy Buffett plays live music at this Amagansett mainstay, which first opened its doors in 1987. The low-key venue can quickly transform from intimate to suffocating during high season weekends with a sprawling line down the block so get there before 9 p.m.

With seemingly countless galleries lining its streets, Chelsea is essentially a museum—one displaying everything from experimental art from up-and-comers to more staid works by longtime greats.

Tucked away on W. 12th Street, between University Street and Fifth Avenue, is this French-inspired café that has been serving up the neighborhood’s creamiest café au laits for years.

Timberlock resort is a haven for trail rides, canoeing on Indian Lake, and even workshop sessions where kids can help make a birdhouse or decorate picture frames with bark and other woodsy finds.

The rollicking East Village biergarten brings Munich to Montauk with the opening of its waterside outpost.

Located discreetly behind red metal gates in what at first glance appears to be a furniture shop, this beer bar has one of the neighborhood’s most extensive lists of craft beer on tap, in bottles and in a few casks that rotate out regularly.

Members show up regularly for continuing-ed classes or workouts in the 80,000-sq-ft gym, but this is hardly your average community center.

Once the site of a chapel on Peter Stuyvesant’s farm, St. Mark’s is more than just a church: the sanctuary does double duty as a performance space and plays as much a part in the neighborhood’s cultural history as in its history of worship.