New York

New York Travel Guide

A serene nail salon that's beloved by beauty editors, TenOverTen is a spot where you'll feel more relaxed as soon as you walk in.

One of the neighborhood’s most popular draws, Brooklyn Brewery was one of the first craft brewers around when it opened in 1988. Today, it produces 26 styles throughout the year, and regularly hosts tours throughout the week.

It was only a matter of time before Williamsburg got its own winery. This one, with 18 locally made, award-winning wines, offers flights, curated cheese and charcuterie plates to accompany tastings, and communal seating to encourage sharing notes.

When Williamsburg was still bereft of a cinema, Nitehawk came in with a decidedly Brooklyn approach. It installed a bar and lounge on the main floor, for before- or after-show lingering. Upstairs, by the screening rooms, another bar serves guests while they wait to be seated.

This floating museum is housed in a former U.S. aircraft carrier that served in WWII and Vietnam War. The ship retired in 1982 and, in that same year, the museum was opened.

This home décor store is the kind of place you can get lost in for hours. Every inch of space (ceiling included) is overflowing with charming gift-worthy items, such as brightly colored Yves Delorme mohair throws, owl-shaped salt and pepper shakers, and Savon de Marseille soaps.

Since 1963, this three-screen cinema has showcased a canon of cult classics—not to mention an eclectic mix of edgier flicks. Want to re-watch Mulholland Drive on the big screen? You may be in luck.

Some buildings are born to be icons. With its unique triangular “iron” shape, Beaux-Arts styling and bragging rights as one of New York’s first skyscrapers, The Flatiron Building’s eternal fame was secured from the beginning.

A summer camp for adults. Straight across the water from Surf Lodge, Ruschmeyer’s is a relative newcomer to the scene having opened in 2011.

Forget the clothes: the real lure is the Rem Koolhaas-designed store itself. Manhattan’s Prada flagship replaced the downtown branch of the Guggenheim Museum in 2001—and since then, architecture freaks (and, yes, fashionistas) have been flocking to the futuristic 23,000-square-foot store.

If the diminutive storefront with its gilded signage, flowerpots, and tin ceiling recalls an earlier era, so does the spirit of this indie bookstore, which has inspired neighborhood loyalty since 1978.

This attractive (and nice-smelling) shop sells space-saving, stylish, and smart housewares. You don’t have to live in a closet-sized apartment to enjoy its great products. Open daily, around noon–around 7 pm.