New York

New York Travel Guide

A serene nail salon that's beloved by beauty editors, TenOverTen is a spot where you'll feel more relaxed as soon as you walk in.

One of the neighborhood’s most popular draws, Brooklyn Brewery was one of the first craft brewers around when it opened in 1988. Today, it produces 26 styles throughout the year, and regularly hosts tours throughout the week.

It was only a matter of time before Williamsburg got its own winery. This one, with 18 locally made, award-winning wines, offers flights, curated cheese and charcuterie plates to accompany tastings, and communal seating to encourage sharing notes.

When Williamsburg was still bereft of a cinema, Nitehawk came in with a decidedly Brooklyn approach. It installed a bar and lounge on the main floor, for before- or after-show lingering. Upstairs, by the screening rooms, another bar serves guests while they wait to be seated.

The equestrian-themed bar launched with Triple Crown viewing parties in a space decked with polo memorabilia and custom furniture from the Pennsylvania Amish. A trio of options—beer garden, lounge, or restaurant—serve sangria and Northeastern micro beers.

Every New Yorker loves a bar with an outdoor patio, and that’s exactly what you’ll find at Bamboo 52. Add to the mix a sushi bar and a well-priced happy hour, which runs from noon until 9 p.m., and you’ve got the makings of the perfect watering hole.

Robin Williams, Conan O’Brien, and Tina Fey have all graced the stage of this heralded 150-seat comedy venue, where shows take place seven nights a week, the tickets are cheap, and there’s no drink minimum.

With occupiers, hipsters, yuppies, NYU-loafers Washington Square Park—an iconic downtown landmark with its own “Arc de Triomphe”—is a mosaic of Village characters.

Check out Mark Twain’s octagonal study at Elmira College, which has artifacts such as his chair, documents, and several photos of nearby Quarry Farm, where he wrote.

Housing 50 NYC-themed lanes, Bowlmor is part bowling alley, part nightclub. Beyond knocking down pins over drinks, there’s also the Stadium Grill Sports Bar and Restaurant, run by celeb chef David Burke.

The department store’s Chelsea location closed down in 1996, but this airy, edgy outpost—set inside a warehouse satisfies the needs of high-fashion shoppers. Both men and women head here for everything from designer jeans to of-the-minute accessories.