New York

Restaurants in New York

With their big-name chefs and dizzying array of options, New York restaurants lead the cusp of food trends. You can dine on the porch of a Finger Lakes restaurant, (nonchalantly) spot celebrities in Soho cafes, or grab a bite in hipster Brooklyn eateries. Here are just a few highlights among New York restaurants:

Vinegar Hill House is a DUMBO (Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Underpass) restaurant offers creative American cuisine such as sunny duck egg and cast iron chicken, finished off with Guinness chocolate cake for dessert. Armani Ristorante is a hidden gem, tucked in the Fifth Avenue Armani store, that offers divine takes on Italian such as Lasgnetta, a decadent stack of eggplant slices and marinara. Peekamoose Restaurant is a New York restaurant and taproom in the Catskills run by chefs who left the Big Apple for the country; its offers huge portions, using lots of produce from local farmers, in a quaint setting. Blue Hill at Stone Barns is a renowned restaurant, in New York’s Pocantico Hills, located in a barn that used to belong to the Rockefellers. It now offers “farmers feats” highlighting the best local produce, poultry, and beef selections. Just bring your appetite: the changing selections include five-course, eight-course or a twelve-course dinners.

Now in its third home in Midtown, this nationally acclaimed restaurant was first established by Sirio Maccioni in 1974. Designed by Adam Tihany, the dining room subtly evokes the restaurant’s circus theme with a huge “big top” light fixture and a collection of porcelain monkeys.

Named after a style of country house found in the south of France, Mas is a French-inspired eatery in the heart of New York’s Greenwich Village. The ambiance is rustic chic, with unfinished wooden floorboards and paneling and low lighting.

At this West Village eatery, Mario Batali and Joe Bastianich successfully recreate a traditional Roman osteria (a casual eatery serving wine and simple fare).

Stephen Bruce opened the doors of this New York staple in 1954, charming patrons with his restaurant’s tiffany lamps, café-style small tables, and whimsical touches like the large hanging butterflies on the second floor.

A modest exterior (the red awning is as flashy as it gets) makes it easy to look past this unique little McDougal Street eatery, which has had SoHo buzzing since its mid '90s debut. 12 Chairs is a welcome departure for diners seeking " a quick, casual something" that isn't pizza or burgers.

Although located in Chelsea, this Parisian style patisserie has a long glass case filled with sweets ranging from fruit tarts to fluffy almond meringue to triple chocolate mousse cake.

A sushi place? For fried chicken? Wince all you like, but once you try the wildly eclectic twist on this southern delicacy, you’ll see. First, the chicken is dredged in a daring invention of matzoh meal, flour, paprika, togarashi peppers, cayenne, and sea salt.

Some New Yorkers cite Papaya King as the penultimate hot dog, but for many natives, there's no substitute for Gray's Papaya. Gray's may have been a latecomer—it was established in 1973, more than 40 years after the original Papaya King—but it serves an even tastier product than its competitor.

The Hampton Chutney Co. in SoHo serves hot, crispy dosas and doughy uttapas, but it's the fresh, homemade chutneys that make this Indian fare stand out.

Trendy trattoria. Originally a horse stable, this restaurant's downstairs lounge, Level V, was more recently a bondage-themed nightclub.

Billed as the “soufflé sanctuary,” this classic French bistro is housed in TriBeCa’s 1891 Fleming Smith Warehouse, a tall structure with green-trimmed gables and Romanesque-style arches.

A husband-and-wife team transformed an old carriage house into a new cafe by moving their Midtown East flower shop around a corner. Inside this small bistro, whitewashed brick, white tablecloths, celery-colored upholstery, and greenery set the atmosphere.

As you enter Wo Hop on Mott Street in Chinatown, two things catch your eye: the red staircase leading down through the sidewalk to the basement restaurant and, once inside, the posters and photos–many of them autographed–that plaster the walls of the cafeteria-style room.