New York

Restaurants in New York

With their big-name chefs and dizzying array of options, New York restaurants lead the cusp of food trends. You can dine on the porch of a Finger Lakes restaurant, (nonchalantly) spot celebrities in Soho cafes, or grab a bite in hipster Brooklyn eateries. Here are just a few highlights among New York restaurants:

Vinegar Hill House is a DUMBO (Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Underpass) restaurant offers creative American cuisine such as sunny duck egg and cast iron chicken, finished off with Guinness chocolate cake for dessert. Armani Ristorante is a hidden gem, tucked in the Fifth Avenue Armani store, that offers divine takes on Italian such as Lasgnetta, a decadent stack of eggplant slices and marinara. Peekamoose Restaurant is a New York restaurant and taproom in the Catskills run by chefs who left the Big Apple for the country; its offers huge portions, using lots of produce from local farmers, in a quaint setting. Blue Hill at Stone Barns is a renowned restaurant, in New York’s Pocantico Hills, located in a barn that used to belong to the Rockefellers. It now offers “farmers feats” highlighting the best local produce, poultry, and beef selections. Just bring your appetite: the changing selections include five-course, eight-course or a twelve-course dinners.

Housed in a former storefront church in Red Hook, this renowned bakery is the brainchild of Matt Lewis and Renato Poliafito, two veterans of the advertising industry.

Aureole is an upscale New York Theater District restaurant in the Bank of America Tower. It's the flagship for restaurant entrepreneur Charlie Palmer, who supports the farm-to-table food movement and specializes in Progressive American cuisine.

Just a short hop eastward from Grand Central Station, installed on the basement level of an office building on East 43rd Street, is an authentic Japanese izakaya with a reputation for being one of the best sake bars in the United States.

Although Moutarde passed as a mid-century French bistro in the 2009 film Julie & Julia, the Park Slope restaurant was renovated a year later to create a more modern look.

Join the Third Wave of the New York coffee revolution. Joe the Art of Coffee cafe in the East Village is placing NYC on the map for top quality coffee.

Max Dannis, a former management consultant, and his wife, architect Linda Gatter, opened the restaurant Local 111 in Philmont in 2006.

Flor de Mayo, on the Upper West Side, serves Chinese, Spanish and Peruvian cuisine from noon to midnight daily and enjoys a good reputation for its portion sizes and value. The pollo a la brasa, Peruvian rotisserie chicken, is a signature dish.

Bryan Calvert, chef and co- owner of James in Brooklyn, New York, loves the versatility of his supermoist lemon pound cake: He uses it to make everything from French toast to a stuffing for baked apples.

Rock star Moby started this Lower East Side cafe with his ex-girlfriend in response to the lack of vegetarian and vegan food in the area. With its soothing white-and-green color palette and natural lighting, it’s something of an oasis for laid-back living in the city.

Befitting a Theater District landmark that's appeared in several films, Sardi's red leather booths are surrounded by autographed caricatures of celebrities ranging from Lucille Ball to Hugh Jackman and Kevin Bacon.

Its clientele has included Harry Truman, Jackie Kennedy, and Cyndi Lauper (who sang impromptu with the house band last year), but one of the most celebrated locals at Bemelmans Bar, in the Carlyle, a Rosewood Hotel, was Ludwig Bemelmans himself.