New York

Restaurants in New York

The scene centers on live entertainment at Café Carlyle, where cabaret legend Bobby Short graced the stage for three decades before passing away in 2005.

Founded in 1975, Joe’s Pizza is a Greenwich Village mainstay serving what is, arguably, the best pizza in New York City.

With fun, kitschy, Americana décor and a comfort-food-only menu, Chat n’ Chew is just the spot when you’ve got a craving for Mom’s mashed potatoes and she's 1,000 miles away.

“Who loves you?” sings Frankie Valli in the legendary Little Owl restaurant in Greenwich Village. The answer is Rosie Bova’s three grandsons—Lou, Joey, and Mikey. Together, they’ve earned wild success, with lines out the door just a few weeks after opening.

Originally opened in 1908, "the Grotta" is an institution in New York City’s Little Italy.

Woks and fryers have no place in the open kitchen that dominates this tiny café, where the emphasis is on grilled and steamed pan-Asian dishes flavored with bold sauces, such as garlic lime chili and curry peanut.

Situated off the beaten path (literally, it's in an alley off of a cobblestone street in Peck Slip), Acqua serves up authentic Italian cuisine and wines to the South Street Seaport area.

Tasty sandwiches come on bread baked on a stone hearth, and the hearty soups are delicious.

Named after a type of thyme that grows in the hills of Tuscany, Pepoline’s is a neighborhood trattoria in TriBeCa. The bi-level space run by chef-owners Patrizio Siddu and Enzo Pezone is comprised of tiled floors, light wood and brick accents, close-together tables, and a patio dining area.

Frank Falcinelli and Frank Castronovo—known collectively by the Brooklyn culinary cognoscenti as “The Franks”—hold court at this hipster-Germanic bistro in the borough’s Cobble Hill neighborhood.

For more than 15 years, owner and executive chef William Mattiello has provided the Flatiron neighborhood with simple cuisine from his hometown Modena, Italy.