New York

Restaurants in New York

At this small Upper East Side omakase-only restaurant, diners are greeted by a sign that reads: Today's Special — Trust Me. The small establishment only seats about 30 people at both the bamboo sushi bar and wooden tables.

When Harold Dieterle created spicy duck meatballs for Top Chef, he admittedly got "sort of spanked." Still, he dominated Season 1 and won the inaugural grand prize. And those same meatballs have become the most oft-demanded signature dish at his restaurant, Perilla.

Owned by a family of Greek food importers, Thalassa in Tribeca predictably offers high quality Greek cuisine, from fresh seafood to an impressive list of Greek wines. Next to the curved bar of Thasosian marble is the ice case of the daily seafood selections, such as the sea bream and rouget.

Chef Michael Anthony’s daily-changing menu evolves with the seasons and what’s fresh at the Union Square greenmarket, where he sources ingredients.

There’s a hippy, trippy kind of rough-hewn beauty to this Williamsburg outpost from Taavo Somer (Freemans, Peels). Step inside the cozy restaurant, which won a James Beard award for its design, and you'll feel like you've just entered a modern farmhouse.



What It’s Like: Celeb hotelier Andre Balazs changed sleepy Shelter Island in the 1990’s when he converted a 60’s motel into a chic beachside hideaway—and Long Island alternative to the Hamptons.

On the corner of 2nd Ave. and 66th St., this Upper East Side Italian restaurant greets guests with a wraparound patio that opens to the main dining room, though most would prefer to sit outside to people watch during warmer months.

Inoteca, located on a bustling corner in the lower East Side, offers an extensive wine selection, small-plate Italian dining, and (perhaps best of all) top notch people-watching.

The hearty restaurant is run by Brooklyn-born chef Devin Mills, who trained at New York's Le Bernardin and Gramercy Tavern. Wood-grilled steaks and 35 beers on tap draw a lively crowd.