New York

Restaurants in New York

With their big-name chefs and dizzying array of options, New York restaurants lead the cusp of food trends. You can dine on the porch of a Finger Lakes restaurant, (nonchalantly) spot celebrities in Soho cafes, or grab a bite in hipster Brooklyn eateries. Here are just a few highlights among New York restaurants:

Vinegar Hill House is a DUMBO (Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Underpass) restaurant offers creative American cuisine such as sunny duck egg and cast iron chicken, finished off with Guinness chocolate cake for dessert. Armani Ristorante is a hidden gem, tucked in the Fifth Avenue Armani store, that offers divine takes on Italian such as Lasgnetta, a decadent stack of eggplant slices and marinara. Peekamoose Restaurant is a New York restaurant and taproom in the Catskills run by chefs who left the Big Apple for the country; its offers huge portions, using lots of produce from local farmers, in a quaint setting. Blue Hill at Stone Barns is a renowned restaurant, in New York’s Pocantico Hills, located in a barn that used to belong to the Rockefellers. It now offers “farmers feats” highlighting the best local produce, poultry, and beef selections. Just bring your appetite: the changing selections include five-course, eight-course or a twelve-course dinners.

The Hampton Chutney Co. in SoHo serves hot, crispy dosas and doughy uttapas, but it's the fresh, homemade chutneys that make this Indian fare stand out.

Donatella Arpaia and Michael Psilakis of New York’s perennially packed Kefi restaurant are behind this informal Italian kitchen. Not to be missed—Psilakis’s signature gnudi with crispy prosciutto and truffle butter.

Just a half block off Times Square, the Lambs Club restaurant inside the Chatwal Hotel is home to one of the better bars in Midtown, which is chockfull of overpriced and rowdy pubs. The Bar, on the second floor of the restaurant, overlooks the hotel’s sleek narrow red-and-black lobby.

The original location in a growing chain of panini-centric restaurants, Press 195 in trendy Park Slope was developed by college friends Brian Karp, Chris Evans, and Jimmy Volz.

Everyone goes to Swoon, to the point where it’s impossible to imagine the town without its pressed-tin ceilings and tattooed and eyebrow-pierced waiters catering smartly to the patrons whose steady conversations thrum their way from Manhattan’s TriBeCa to Hudson’s Warren Street.

Installed in a small, sunny storefront in East Harlem, Il Caffe Latte is a tidy, red-brick neighborhood café serving breakfast, lunch, and dinner.

Pretty young things flirt by the light of flickering votives in this fabulously romantic brick-walled space that evokes a 1920's speakeasy half-hidden on a forlorn stretch of the Lower East Side.

Hard as it may be for homesick Catalonians or proud Basques to admit it, the best Spanish restaurant in town is run by a guy from Vermont named Seamus.

Sure, Danny Meyer has his multi-award-winning fine-dining establishments, but his fans' most unabashed adoration has been reserved for his contemporary, urban rendition of the roadside pit stop. Shake Shack is an ode to two of his most beloved St.

After closing the original Harry's in 2003, the son of the original owner reopened and revived the space in 2006 by dividing it into two parts: one part formal steakhouse, one part casual café.

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"British-born Annie Wayte, one of New York's great unsung chefs, creates soulful soups and beautiful greenmarket salads at this whimsically rusticated café inside Nicole Farhi's Chelsea Market boutique.