New York

Restaurants in New York

Inspired by her childhood summers spent in Maine, chef Rebecca Charles opened Pearl Oyster Bar in 1999 after noticing the absence of fresh lobster rolls on New York’s culinary scene.

Though this pizza joint is technically in Greenpoint, Williamsburg’s quieter neighbor to the north, the Neopolitan-style pizza made in the domed white-tiled oven here is worth the 10-minute walk from “the Burg” for its simple but delicious thin-crusted pies.

The second restaurant from April Bloomfield focuses on (what else?) seafood.

What began as a lone fruit and vegetable stand in 1933 is now a multistory gourmet grocery store in the Upper West Side, known for its vast displays of prime meats, artisan cheeses, fresh produce, and imported goods from across the globe.

Barbarini’s Alimentari has been serving authentic Italian cuisine to South Street Seaport diners since 2006. The brick-walled restaurant has a few tiny tables under expansive skylights, which cultivate a bright ambiance framed by rusticity.

Tasty sandwiches come on bread baked on a stone hearth, and the hearty soups are delicious.

What It’s Like: As classic as a string of pearls, this New York jewel—in a perfect setting on the East River under the Brooklyn Bridge—has romanced diners since it opened its doors in 1977.

Frank Falcinelli and Frank Castronovo—known collectively by the Brooklyn culinary cognoscenti as “The Franks”—hold court at this hipster-Germanic bistro in the borough’s Cobble Hill neighborhood.

Renowned owner-chef Jean-Georges Vongerichten brings Southeast Asian street fare to the gorgeous Spice Market in the Meatpacking District. One enters through an intricately carved wooden pagoda with lush red curtains.

This Old World trattoria, with its rustic wood floor, marble-topped bar, antique wooden tables, fancy chandeliers, textured walls, and wine bottle-lined shelves, seems a world (and a few decades) removed from its East 90 address, which puts it in thick of one of Manhattan's most affluent neighbor

In Ye Olde Days there was New York–style pizza. It was available by the floppy, foldable, roof-of-your-mouth-scalding slice on every corner from the Bronx to the Bowery, a fixture of city life as common as yellow taxis.