New York

Restaurants in New York

The atmosphere of this Sardinian enoteca in downtown Williamsburg breathes cozy, old-world rusticity with aged hardwood floors, woodblock tables, brass finishings, tapered candles, a tin-paneled ceiling, and cushioned banquettes.

Congee Village, on the outskirts of Chinatown, offers an extensive menu of more than 250 classic Cantonese dishes. As the name suggests, the restaurant is best known for its congee, or rice porridge; options include the chicken and black mushroom.

Now in its third home in Midtown, this nationally acclaimed restaurant was first established by Sirio Maccioni in 1974. Designed by Adam Tihany, the dining room subtly evokes the restaurant’s circus theme with a huge “big top” light fixture and a collection of porcelain monkeys.

Stephen Bruce opened the doors of this New York staple in 1954, charming patrons with his restaurant’s tiffany lamps, café-style small tables, and whimsical touches like the large hanging butterflies on the second floor.

Sample the award-winning wine list and French country cuisine, made with organic produce from the restaurant's garden.

At this West Village eatery, Mario Batali and Joe Bastianich successfully recreate a traditional Roman osteria (a casual eatery serving wine and simple fare).

A sushi place? For fried chicken? Wince all you like, but once you try the wildly eclectic twist on this southern delicacy, you’ll see. First, the chicken is dredged in a daring invention of matzoh meal, flour, paprika, togarashi peppers, cayenne, and sea salt.

Cozy Mexican cantina in the Meatpacking District

Although located in Chelsea, this Parisian style patisserie has a long glass case filled with sweets ranging from fruit tarts to fluffy almond meringue to triple chocolate mousse cake.

A riff on the deliterias that dominate in Midtown, this rabbi-supervised Kosher deli is located not far from the Diamond District. Serving old-school lunch and breakfast fare, Milk and Honey sells everything from sandwiches and salads to pizzia, even sushi.

This loud and dark stylized place with its ornate cocktails, Rat Pack-style red leather booths, and electronica soundtrack might look like yet another faux-Asian downtown boîte. Then you tuck into the dim sum and realize that you haven’t eaten like this since your last trip to Hong Kong.

Patience grasshopper, there are some restaurants where experience trumps food. In the Time Warner Center in Columbus Circle, you’ll be transported up the escalators to an ethereal realm where chef Masa creates one of the premier dining experiences in the world.

The seasonal menu at A Voce in the Flatiron district focuses on rustic Italian dishes and fresh ingredients. The meat ravioli, a family recipe, is made with pork, beef, and veal and served with chunky tomato sauce and flakes of Parmesan.