New York

Restaurants in New York

With their big-name chefs and dizzying array of options, New York restaurants lead the cusp of food trends. You can dine on the porch of a Finger Lakes restaurant, (nonchalantly) spot celebrities in Soho cafes, or grab a bite in hipster Brooklyn eateries. Here are just a few highlights among New York restaurants:

Vinegar Hill House is a DUMBO (Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Underpass) restaurant offers creative American cuisine such as sunny duck egg and cast iron chicken, finished off with Guinness chocolate cake for dessert. Armani Ristorante is a hidden gem, tucked in the Fifth Avenue Armani store, that offers divine takes on Italian such as Lasgnetta, a decadent stack of eggplant slices and marinara. Peekamoose Restaurant is a New York restaurant and taproom in the Catskills run by chefs who left the Big Apple for the country; its offers huge portions, using lots of produce from local farmers, in a quaint setting. Blue Hill at Stone Barns is a renowned restaurant, in New York’s Pocantico Hills, located in a barn that used to belong to the Rockefellers. It now offers “farmers feats” highlighting the best local produce, poultry, and beef selections. Just bring your appetite: the changing selections include five-course, eight-course or a twelve-course dinners.

Thirty-five years ago, Eileen Weinberg opened a take-out eatery under an arcade on the western edge of the Broadway Theatre District, where she offered home-style comfort food at a gourmet level and used only the freshest ingredients.

Freemans in the lower East Side is easy to miss, as it's tucked at the end of a cobblestone alley with only small hanging lights to guide you.

Boulud brings his bistro classics to New York's Lincoln Center neighborhood.

TriBeCa’s resurgence has attracted a number of well-known restaurant openings to the downtown neighborhood, but none rival the nearly 10 years of planning that went into Brushstroke, where chef David Bouley tapped masters from the famed Tsuji cooking school in Osaka.

Sushi Seki is a comfortable, no-frills restaurant in the upper East Side, with green-tea colored walls and a plain wooden sushi bar. In lieu of a dazzlying atmosphere, the focus is on some of the most loved Japanese food in the city.

TV Chef Mario Batali and partner Joe Bastianich are better known for their true-to-form Italian restaurants, but their sole Spanish adventure, Casa Mono, had an immediate impact on the New York dining scene upon opening in 2004.

For customers leaving this restaurant located in the Meatpacking District, it may be the décor and layout that sticks in the mind instead of the food: No matter how delicious the dishes may be, it’s hard to compete with the charm of three-level, 1848 brownstone town house.

The Grill Room at the Four Seasons on East 52nd Street is a New York City classic—with the price tag to prove it.

L’Artusi, the second venture from Gabriel Thompson and Joe Campanale (the duo behind popular West Village restaurant Dell’anima), is a stylish Greenwich Village eatery serving Italian and Mediterranean inspired dishes.

What good New Yorker doesn’t crave a 2 a.m. slice? Stroll to the Brooklyn outpost of Joe’s Pizza where Park Slope’s partiers finish their nights with tasty thin-crust renditions of classics like tomato, fresh mozzarella and basil, or barbeque chicken pizza.

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