New York

Restaurants in New York


As the first Brooklyn location of this small chain of Thai restaurants, it is also the largest at 7,500 square feet. Filled with materials like wood, brick, slate, concrete, and wrought iron, the dining room’s décor is a combination of industrial chic and art deco.

Inspired by her childhood summers spent in Maine, chef Rebecca Charles opened Pearl Oyster Bar in 1999 after noticing the absence of fresh lobster rolls on New York’s culinary scene.

The original Il Buco a block away started life as an antique shop and evolved into a homey, well-loved trattoria.

Salumeria Rosi may be the only restaurant in the city with an in-house salumiere, who oversees the kitchen's selection of cured-meats and curates tasting platters.

What began as a lone fruit and vegetable stand in 1933 is now a multistory gourmet grocery store in the Upper West Side, known for its vast displays of prime meats, artisan cheeses, fresh produce, and imported goods from across the globe.

At Norma’s inside Le Parker Meridian hotel in Midtown, meals start with a shot of fruit smoothie before glasses of freshly squeezed orange juice (with complimentary refills) are offered.

Few New Yorkers know oysters the way Jay Shaffer does. The Long Island native even raises his own, on beds in Shinnecock Inlet (he sells them here as "Shaffer Cove" oysters).

Freemans in the lower East Side is easy to miss, as it's tucked at the end of a cobblestone alley with only small hanging lights to guide you.


Short for Righteous Urban Barbeque, RUB is helmed by legendary Kansas City pit master Paul Clark, who grills up tender meat dishes like beef brisket, bacon chunks, and burnt ends at his Chelsea restaurant, and serves them by the pound in metal pie plates and Styrofoam cups.

New owner Jayma Cardoso has dialed back the Bacchanalian revelry and returned the Surf Lodge to its more mellow origins.

Sushi Seki is a comfortable, no-frills restaurant in the upper East Side, with green-tea colored walls and a plain wooden sushi bar. In lieu of a dazzlying atmosphere, the focus is on some of the most loved Japanese food in the city.

This Old World trattoria, with its rustic wood floor, marble-topped bar, antique wooden tables, fancy chandeliers, textured walls, and wine bottle-lined shelves, seems a world (and a few decades) removed from its East 90 address, which puts it in thick of one of Manhattan's most affluent neighbor