New York

Restaurants in New York

With their big-name chefs and dizzying array of options, New York restaurants lead the cusp of food trends. You can dine on the porch of a Finger Lakes restaurant, (nonchalantly) spot celebrities in Soho cafes, or grab a bite in hipster Brooklyn eateries. Here are just a few highlights among New York restaurants:

Vinegar Hill House is a DUMBO (Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Underpass) restaurant offers creative American cuisine such as sunny duck egg and cast iron chicken, finished off with Guinness chocolate cake for dessert. Armani Ristorante is a hidden gem, tucked in the Fifth Avenue Armani store, that offers divine takes on Italian such as Lasgnetta, a decadent stack of eggplant slices and marinara. Peekamoose Restaurant is a New York restaurant and taproom in the Catskills run by chefs who left the Big Apple for the country; its offers huge portions, using lots of produce from local farmers, in a quaint setting. Blue Hill at Stone Barns is a renowned restaurant, in New York’s Pocantico Hills, located in a barn that used to belong to the Rockefellers. It now offers “farmers feats” highlighting the best local produce, poultry, and beef selections. Just bring your appetite: the changing selections include five-course, eight-course or a twelve-course dinners.

Opened in 2001 in New York City's Upper West Side, Ouest Restaurant serves up Nouveau American cuisine. Inside the well-lit dining room, red-and-white-striped pendant lamps hang from the vaulted ceiling, and circular red leather booths create an intimate experience.

Situated on 5th Avenue in the historic and affluent Upper East Side, Le Caprice is the stateside cousin of a famous brasserie in London with the same name.

La Bottega Italian restaurant in Chelsea is a surprising find, being housed in the lobby of the Maritime Hotel. The funky trattoria is tiled in white, with borders of bottles, baskets of oranges, and hanging salamis, while brown leather banquettes surround the free pool table.

Joe Campanale seems too young to have been a sommelier at Babbo—he’s 24—but his Joe Campanale seems too young to have been a sommelier at Babbo—he’s 24—but his smart Italian wine list and herbal-infused cocktails at this always-packed new restaurant prove otherwise. Drinks $15.

Cuban and Mexican prove a wining combination at this lively little Nolita café. The ambience starts with bright blue exterior and extends indoors with colorful tiles and a stainless steel counter, resulting in a kind of cross-cultural diner effect.

Resto, French slang for a casual restaurant, opened its doors in 2007. Owner Christian Pappanicholas wanted to create a casual Gramercy Park neighborhood spot with bar and sidewalk seating that served Belgian fare.

If you ask someone where they want to go out to eat, few consider a museum. The proprietors of Modern, located inside the Museum of Modern Art, aim to change that.

This sleek, wooden East Village noodle bar has the right kind of hype—not the high-gloss, flashy, media type, but the street level, word-of-mouth kind. The reason?

Occupying a former bodega in Lower Manhattan, WD~50 is acclaimed chef Wylie Dufresne's first venture where he is both the owner and chef.

The cozy copper-topped Monkey Bar draws from both pub and fine-dining menus (chicken pot pie and braised halibut).

Dedicated to creating “a new chocolate culture,” Max Brenner, who often refers to himself as "the bald man," opened this restaurant devoted solely to chocolate back in 2006.

Owned by Jody Williams and Michael Bull, Gottino is, in Williams' own words, a “gastroteca,” or Italian gastropub. Located in New York City’s West Village, Gottino serves small plates alongside glasses of red and white wine (all from Italy, of course).

Owned by Juilliard-scholar and opera-tenor Tommaso Verdillo, this family-friendly Italian restaurant is located in Bath Beach. The interior is marked by a large-scale, Renaissance-style wall painting of an outdoor-dining scene, which hangs above white linen-covered tables and high-backed, black-m