New York

Restaurants in New York

At Mile End Delicatessen, in Brooklyn, Noah and Rae Bernamoff serve Montreal-style bagels; Noah is from Montreal and, as is typical, thinks their bagels are better than New York’s. New York's are hard, boiled, the hole irregular; theirs is softer, sweeter, as if a metaphor for Canadian life.

This inventive Japanese restaurant named after head chef Nobuyuki Matsuhisa is a Tribeca fixture. Nobu evokes the Japanese countryside with David Rockwell's interior design of natural textures, birch trees, wood floors, and river stones.

Peter Luger lets the steaks speak for themselves, and it works: the chain, including this tavern-like Williamsburg location, is consistently voted the best steakhouse in NYC and earned one Michelin star in 2012.

The Scene: One of the early dining clubs on the NYC scene, this five-year-old self-proclaimed “culinary speakeasy” is still smoking—thanks in large part to its warm and talented hosts: southerners Becky (from Florida) and Hayden (from North Carolina).

There's no hiding in this brightly lit, red- and gold-accented restaurant in Flushing. The authenticity—and thus, the heat—of Spicy & Tasty's Sichuan cuisine sets it apart from the abundance of other Asian restaurants in the area.

Husband-and-wife team Marco Moreira and Jo-Ann Makovitzky combined their backgrounds in sushi (Marco) and classic French cuisine (Jo-Ann) to open Union Square’s Tocqueville in 2000.

Here, Alex Raij and Bilbao-born Eder Montero (former chefs at the beloved tapas haunt Tía Pol) preach authentic Basque—not Spanish—cooking.

Gusto Ristorante and Bar bills itself “as close to actually dining in Italy as it gets.” This West Village neighborhood eatery has won the loyalty of regulars with its emphasis on freshness; all pasta is made in-house, and the menu changes regularly to take advantage of seasonal produce.

Part restaurant, part lounge, and part event space, Taj II serves American-Indian fusion cuisine in a stylish, two-story building located in the Flatiron district.

Serving an extensive menu of pan-Asian fare, this cash-only restaurant is housed inside two adjacent storefronts in the Park Slope neighborhood.

This Westchester institution has, since it opened in 1919, done things differently. The main (and only) attraction is the dogs—a hybrid of beef, pork, and veal, they're split down the center, grilled with a "secret sauce," then served with homemade mustard.

Dress smartly if heading to Restaurant Gordon Ramsay, an elegant dining room helmed by Ramsay protégé Markus Glocker and installed within Midtown West's high-dollar London NYC Hotel.