New York

Restaurants in New York

With their big-name chefs and dizzying array of options, New York restaurants lead the cusp of food trends. You can dine on the porch of a Finger Lakes restaurant, (nonchalantly) spot celebrities in Soho cafes, or grab a bite in hipster Brooklyn eateries. Here are just a few highlights among New York restaurants:

Vinegar Hill House is a DUMBO (Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Underpass) restaurant offers creative American cuisine such as sunny duck egg and cast iron chicken, finished off with Guinness chocolate cake for dessert. Armani Ristorante is a hidden gem, tucked in the Fifth Avenue Armani store, that offers divine takes on Italian such as Lasgnetta, a decadent stack of eggplant slices and marinara. Peekamoose Restaurant is a New York restaurant and taproom in the Catskills run by chefs who left the Big Apple for the country; its offers huge portions, using lots of produce from local farmers, in a quaint setting. Blue Hill at Stone Barns is a renowned restaurant, in New York’s Pocantico Hills, located in a barn that used to belong to the Rockefellers. It now offers “farmers feats” highlighting the best local produce, poultry, and beef selections. Just bring your appetite: the changing selections include five-course, eight-course or a twelve-course dinners.

Tucked in the back of a marina, this open-air restaurant is worth seeking out for its grilled Mexican corn on the cob.

Located on the Lower East Side, Rayuela is an innovative eatery presenting its own spin on Latin American and Spanish cuisine, referred to as estilo libre latino cuisine.

So hefty it comes in a 5-inch-thick binder, the wine list at this modern restaurant in the Flatiron Building is among the biggest in the city.

Opened in 1913, tucked in the vaulted subterranean chambers of Grand Central Station, the Oyster Bar serves two million bivalves a year.

The French-inspired Japanese cuisine at Geisha, in the upper East Side, is at once complex and elegant, as is the ambiance.

At this small Upper East Side omakase-only restaurant, diners are greeted by a sign that reads: Today's Special — Trust Me. The small establishment only seats about 30 people at both the bamboo sushi bar and wooden tables.

When Harold Dieterle created spicy duck meatballs for Top Chef, he admittedly got "sort of spanked." Still, he dominated Season 1 and won the inaugural grand prize. And those same meatballs have become the most oft-demanded signature dish at his restaurant, Perilla.

Owned by a family of Greek food importers, Thalassa in Tribeca predictably offers high quality Greek cuisine, from fresh seafood to an impressive list of Greek wines. Next to the curved bar of Thasosian marble is the ice case of the daily seafood selections, such as the sea bream and rouget.

Beloved for its cozy tavernlike charm (think wooden beams and twiggy flower arrangements), creative cocktails, and the seductive aromas that waft from the open grill, this New York institution is just one reason for Danny Meyer’s fan base (Union Square Café and The Modern have only enhanced his m

There’s a hippy, trippy kind of rough-hewn beauty to this Williamsburg outpost from Taavo Somer (Freemans, Peels). Exposed beams and brick everywhere and cut firewood piled high in triangular pods against one wall.

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This tiny Vietnamese sandwich shop in Sunset Park may appear somewhat disheveled and ramshackled, but its cheap, delicious sandwiches account for the intense crowding at lunch times.

In the heart of NYC’s Greenwich Village sits this neighborhood favorite. Established in 1977, Knickerbocker Bar & Grill features wood-paneled walls filled with memorabilia like original caricatures by Al Hirschfield and copies of the Saturday Evening Post.