New York

Restaurants in New York

The Scene: One of the early dining clubs on the NYC scene, this five-year-old self-proclaimed “culinary speakeasy” is still smoking—thanks in large part to its warm and talented hosts: southerners Becky (from Florida) and Hayden (from North Carolina).

There's no hiding in this brightly lit, red- and gold-accented restaurant in Flushing. The authenticity—and thus, the heat—of Spicy & Tasty's Sichuan cuisine sets it apart from the abundance of other Asian restaurants in the area.

Husband-and-wife team Marco Moreira and Jo-Ann Makovitzky combined their backgrounds in sushi (Marco) and classic French cuisine (Jo-Ann) to open Union Square’s Tocqueville in 2000.

Here, Alex Raij and Bilbao-born Eder Montero (former chefs at the beloved tapas haunt Tía Pol) preach authentic Basque—not Spanish—cooking.

Gusto Ristorante and Bar bills itself “as close to actually dining in Italy as it gets.” This West Village neighborhood eatery has won the loyalty of regulars with its emphasis on freshness; all pasta is made in-house, and the menu changes regularly to take advantage of seasonal produce.

Part restaurant, part lounge, and part event space, Taj II serves American-Indian fusion cuisine in a stylish, two-story building located in the Flatiron district.

Serving an extensive menu of pan-Asian fare, this cash-only restaurant is housed inside two adjacent storefronts in the Park Slope neighborhood.

This spare yet cozy East Village joint, endearingly decorated with old agricultural implements and populated by bearded neo-bohemians, is the brainchild of Peter Hoffman, who was championing sustainable agriculture at Savoy long before the current farm-to-table trend swept up New York.

"It's a temple of chicken in midtown Manhattan, the real deal and a long-time chefs' favorite. Head up the stairs and give them your name and telephone number-then have a drink next door at the karaoke joint until they call you.

Consistently named among the best Mexican restaurants in Manhattan, El Paso has three uptown locations including this lively outpost on Lexington Avenue. “Authentic” is the restaurant’s watchword: the recipes are not Americanized, and the emphasis is on fresh, traditional ingredients.

 

Anthos closed for business in August 2010.

Chef-owner Daniel Nilsson's DNA may well be found in the Swedish specials he presents each week, like the toast Skagen, with its judicious use of dill, cold shrimp, and delectable whitefish roe.

Not surprisingly, the roast duck is the signature dish at Peking Duck House in Chinatown, and little wonder. The preparation of Peking duck is notoriously laborious and complex, and this is one spot that does it well. The skin is rubbed with maltose and roasted in a hot oven.